Hollow City: The Second Novel of Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children

Hollow City: The Second Novel of Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children

Ransom Riggs

Language: English

Pages: 416

ISBN: 1594747350

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Hollow City: The Second Novel of Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children

Ransom Riggs

Language: English

Pages: 416

ISBN: 1594747350

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The movie adaptation of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is in theaters September 2016.

The New York Times #1 best selling series

September 3, 1940. Ten peculiar children flee an army of deadly monsters. And only one person can help them—but she’s trapped in the body of a bird. The extraordinary journey that began in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children continues as Jacob Portman and his newfound friends journey to London, the peculiar capital of the world. There, they hope to find a cure for their beloved headmistress, Miss Peregrine. But in this war-torn city, hideous surprises lurk around every corner. And before Jacob can deliver the peculiar children to safety, he must make an important decision about his love for Emma Bloom. Like its predecessor, this second novel in the Peculiar Children series blends thrilling fantasy with vintage photography to create a one-of-a-kind reading experience.

“A stunning achievement . . Hollow City is even richer than Riggs’s imaginative debut, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children”—Boston Globe

Bonus features:
• Sneak preview of the third Peculiar Children novel
• Exclusive Q&A with Ransom Riggs
• Never-before-seen peculiar photography

Blood Trail (Vicki Nelson, Book 2)

King of Foxes (Conclave of Shadows, Book 2)

Mort (Discworld, Book 4)

Two Serpents Rise

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

eyes to adjust or to feel our way carefully or to do anything other than run in a gasping, stumbling herd with arms outstretched, dodging trunks that seemed to coalesce suddenly in the air just inches from us. After a few minutes we stopped, chests heaving, to listen. The voices were still behind us, only now they were joined by another sound: dogs barking. We ran on. We tumbled through the black woods for what seemed like hours, no moon or movement of stars by which to judge the passing

my arms to go and attend to Claire. I felt a twinge of jealousy, then guilt for being jealous of a sick friend. So I lay alone feeling irrationally forsaken and stared into the dark, more exhausted than I had ever been and yet unable now to sleep, listening to the others shift and moan in the grip of nightmares that could not have equalled the one we would likely wake to. And eventually the dark peeled back layer by layer, and with imperceptible gradations the sky feathered to a delicate pale

“And I don’t like being hunted by invisible corpse beasts,” said the clown, and he began to pry the older brother from the younger. The boys locked arms and moaned loudly, their tongues clicking and eyes rolling wildly in their heads. I was about to intervene when the brothers came apart and let out a doubled scream so loud and piercing I feared my head would break. The dishes on the table shattered, everyone ducked and clapped their hands over their ears, and I thought I could hear, from the

an extraordinary life, as he had done; and that one day, like Grandpa Portman, I would do something that mattered. He used to say to me: “You’re going to be a great man, Yakob. A very great man.” “Like you?” I would ask him. “Better,” he’d reply. I’d believed him then, and I still wanted to. But the more I learned about him, the longer his shadow became, and the more impossible it seemed that I could ever matter the way he had. That maybe it would be suicidal even to try. And when I imagined

you back through the carnival, into the underground, and when you pass through the changeover, you’ll be back in the present. Think you can manage from there?” “I think so,” I said. “I’ll call my parents. Or go to a police station, or something. I’m sure there’s a poster of my face in every precinct in Britain by now, knowing my dad.” I laughed a little, because if I hadn’t, I might’ve started crying. “Okay, then,” she said. “Okay, then,” I said. We looked at each other, not quite ready to

Download sample

Download