House and Philosophy: Everybody Lies

House and Philosophy: Everybody Lies

Henry Jacoby

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 0470316608

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

House and Philosophy: Everybody Lies

Henry Jacoby

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 0470316608

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


An unauthorized look at the philosophical issues raised by one of today's most popular television shows: House

House is one of the top three television dramas on the air, pulling in more than 19 million viewers for each episode. This latest book in the popular Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture series takes a deeper look at the characters and issues raised in this Emmy Award-winning medical drama, offering entertaining answers to the fascinating ethical questions viewers have about Dr. Gregory House and his medical team.

Henry Jacoby (Goldsboro, NC) teaches philosophy at East Carolina University. He has published articles primarily on the philosophy of mind and was a contributor to South Park and Philosophy
(978-1-4051-6160-2).

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The Astro Boy Essays: Osamu Tezuka, Mighty Atom, and the Manga/Anime Revolution

Downton Abbey and Philosophy: The Truth Is Neither Here Nor There (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

more precise; and it’s progressive and degenerative. The better House gets rationally, the worse he gets psychologically. The abductions become faster, his perception more fine-tuned. This one overcoded, that one undercoded, two at once, all day long: inferences about his team and their problems, Cuddy, a rat, a guy in the park, anything and anyone, God, and the human condition. He just can’t stop; and as many Vicodins he tosses back, they’re no relief from his magnificent gifts. The true tragedy

NOTES 1. Mu Soeng, Thousand Peaks: Korean Zen—Traditions and Teachers (Cumberland, RI: Primary Point Press, 1996), 173. 2. We’ve slipped in “action” here and added it to “sense,” and we’ll see a little later that this is actually a very important connection for House and Zen—and that there is a very important and illuminating reason why it had to be just slipped in, a bit slyly and without appropriate explanation or justification! This is a little hint that our essay is up to some House or Zen

The students propose to take a family history of the patient, run a CBC, do a D-dimer, get an MRI, and perhaps perform a PET scan. When House tells them that the patient would’ve died if he’d been treated this way, a student cries out: “We had no time to run any tests; there was nothing we could do!” So what should one do? In the Phaedo, Socrates tells Cebes: “In every case I first lay down the theory which I judge to be soundest.”3 Sounds like House’s “differential diagnosis”: first look at the

form of moral reasoning.2 Gilligan and other care-focused feminists argue that ethical theory tends to reflect only the traditional approach to moral deliberation known as the ethic of justice, which encourages the application of abstract, universal rules and principles to moral problems, appealing to notions of impartiality, independence, and fairness. For example, consider the scenario in which a person is thinking about stealing a loaf of bread, which he cannot afford to buy, in order to feed

V E R Y B O D Y ” : C A M E R O N ’ S E T H I C S O F C A R E 133 Hannah: You’d really tell? Cameron: Yeah. Hannah: You’d die? Hannah’s question—would Cameron sacrifice her own life to ensure that she met her caring responsibilities?—points to an important philosophical criticism of the ethics of care. Does Cameron Care Too Much? The ethics of care is appreciated by most feminists as an important contribution to ethical theory because it both recognizes and validates women’s experiences in an

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