How To Use Automotive Diagnostic Scanners (Motorbooks Workshop)

How To Use Automotive Diagnostic Scanners (Motorbooks Workshop)

Tracy Martin

Language: English

Pages: 200

ISBN: 0760347735

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

How To Use Automotive Diagnostic Scanners (Motorbooks Workshop)

Tracy Martin

Language: English

Pages: 200

ISBN: 0760347735

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Scan your own codes to save money, fix problems, or get the best performance out of your ride!

Scanning the code to determine why your "check engine" light has come on is frequently more costly than the repair itself! Scanning automotive systems at home can save you money and only requires the ability to plug a phone or tablet into an easily accessible port on the car. With the right dock, it is possible to perform diagnostic checks in your very own garage.

From handheld, dedicated units to software that turns PCs and portable devices into powerful diagnostic scanners, today's auto enthusiasts can access and analyze their vehicle's on-board diagnostic systems. This is great news, and not just for repairs. With the right information, these scanners can be used as low-budget data acquistion systems and dynamometers to maximize your vehicle's performance.

How to Use Automotive Diagnostic Scanners teaches you how to choose the right scanner for your application and how to use it, with a comprehensive list of what each code means. Photos and diagrams help you understand OBD-I and OBD-II systems (including CAN) and the scanners that read the information they record. From catalytic converters and O2 sensors to emissions and automotive detective work, this is the complete reference for keeping your vehicle EPA-compliant and on the road!

Killing the Messenger: The Right-Wing Plot to Derail Hillary and Hijack Your Government

The Future of Money: From Financial Crisis to Public Resource

Social Injustice and Public Health (2nd Edition)

In Defense of Hypocrisy: Picking Sides in the War on Virtue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

misfire, and fuel trim monitors to run. 3. Accelerate the vehicle to a speed between 50 and 60 mph (80 to 96 kph). The misfire and fuel trim diagnostics will be performed. 4. The vehicle speed should now be held steady between 50 and 60 mph (80 to 96 kph) for about three minutes. The PCM will run the 02 response, misfire, and fuel trim monitors. 5. At the end of this three-minute period (step 4), the accelerator pedal should be released and the vehicle allowed to decelerate to 20 mph (32 kph)

Included within the scope of J-1930, as written, is the following clarification: “This document focuses on diagnostic terms applicable to electrical/electronic systems, and therefore also contains related mechanical terms, definitions, abbreviations, and acronyms.” This clause means that standardized trouble codes were mandatory, and that all manufacturers would be required to use the same definitions on every OBD-II vehicle. In addition, automotive terminology, acronyms, and emission testing

monitors tests, and display OBD-II modules present to specific vehicles. The Actron Elite AutoScanner Pro CP9190 scan tool offers many professional-grade features not typically found in other do-it-yourself types of scanners. For instance, this scan tool’s ability to simultaneously and graphically represent live real time data as well as recorded data is a real bonus when diagnosing intermittent drivability problems. This sophisticated tool works with both generations of OBD-I- and

battery is in good condition. The battery seen here shows 10.46 volts, which indicates it is in like-new condition. Another battery test indicates how much cranking capacity a battery has available to start an engine. This battery load test stresses a battery by placing an electrical load upon it. The fuel-injection or ignition system will have to be disabled in order to perform this test. With one of these systems disabled the engine can be cranked over without starting. Typically, just

the mid- to late 1980s, worn-out carburetors were exchanged for “rebuilt” units. But, as might now be expected, carburetor re-manufacturers were no better at rebuilding computer-controlled carburetors than most mechanics. Consequently, the “rebuilt” carburetors were often worse than the ones they replaced, since the technicians responsible for the rebuilds often mixed up internal parts between carburetor models. In addition, “rebuilt” carburetors were very expensive—often costing hundreds of

Download sample

Download