How To Write Poetry: A Resource for Students and Teachers of Creative Writing

How To Write Poetry: A Resource for Students and Teachers of Creative Writing

Cynthia Sharp

Language: English

Pages: 67

ISBN: B00PPYC8N8

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

How To Write Poetry: A Resource for Students and Teachers of Creative Writing

Cynthia Sharp

Language: English

Pages: 67

ISBN: B00PPYC8N8

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


How To Write Poetry - A Resource for Students and Teachers of Creative Writing

Have you struggled to write an authentic, inspirational, moving poem? Learn how to write beautiful poems with How To Write Poetry by Cynthia Sharp.

From classic haiku to multi-style poetic license, How To Write Poetry is a beautiful series of lessons on not just how to inspire your poetic heart, but also how to write, confident your poems are correctly structured and full of authentic meaning and story. Cynthia Sharp has been published in numerous literary journals and anthologies on four continents. Her short stories and poetry have been broadcast internationally and nominated for The Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net Anthology. She taught high school for many years before becoming a writing coach and holds honors degrees in creative writing and English.

How To Write Poetry is for both teachers and individuals who yearn to write beautiful, moving, inspirational poems. Starting with an exercise in sensory writing, Cynthia Sharp takes the reader on a journey that allows both the novice and more established poet to grasp the intricacies and subtleties of poetic structure, connecting words with the reader’s emotions and heart.

How To Write Poetry is a compilation of proven and praised workshops and lessons offered to thousands of students of all English language levels and cultural backgrounds. The course material can easily be adjusted for small to large groups, individual instruction, and home use for your own more casual introduction to writing poetry. Cynthia Sharp states in her introduction, "What I offer you is the art of poetry with a spiritual touch – a guide to inspire your soul into words. We begin with meditative prompts to evoke your inner voice. As the chapters advance, classical terms and linguistics analysis are applied into concrete steps tailored to enhance the literary quality of every poet’s vision.”

What you will learn in How To Write Poetry: Chapters

  • Introduction
  • Sensory Writing
  • Feeding the Light
  • Personification
  • Flowing with Tao – A Mindful Approach
  • All Things in Time – From Meditations to Specific Details
  • Specific Detail – Quiet Listening and Observation Exercise
  • Writing From Remembrance – What Stories Are In Your Hands?
  • Poetry Starters
  • Punctuation & Grammar
  • Editing Techniques – The Art of Release
  • Anointing Ourselves Ready
  • Conclusion

Download this marvelous book by Cynthia Sharp and start writing authentic and moving poetry today!

Many poetry students, young and old, have wanted to learn how to write poems and share their poetic vision with the world. Lacking in training, confidence and knowledge, learning how to write poetry for their own books or poetry anthology never sees the light of day. Now you can learn how to write poetry in the comfort of your home, at your leisure and at a comfortable pace, developing your craft to touch the hearts and souls of poets and readers alike.

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it around her neck time and time again, after it was lost in dramatic encounters with enemies. The audience later learned that the necklace had once belonged to Rebekah, Stephan’s former girlfriend he had been compelled to forget, and to the Original Witch, Rebekah’s mother. What we can learn from television script writers’ use of symbol is that each character sees, uses or reacts to the symbol in a slightly different way, and the symbol takes on new meaning that builds powerfully through the

maintaining a safe and respectful atmosphere. Any imagery that writers chose to omit from this particular poem can become similes and metaphors to use in other pieces. Poets can start a new file called “imagery,” in which to store material that did not make it into this particular piece created today. You can enhance your imagery file by recording nature as it is, then adapting the observations into similes and metaphors for future pieces. Feeding the Light Starting a writing session

his absence. In a traditional Japanese tanka, the first two lines are about love, told with imagery in a similar manner to haiku, then the third line suggests a pivotal change, and the last two lines give profound meaning to it all. Tanka are traditionally untitled. As in haiku, nature imagery carries the poem, the voice of the lover. The tanka below begins with the freshness of youth, represented by summer, and the excitement of a first life-changing passionate love. Line three moves to his

years of runs and trails wind-blessed at the ocean, a distant promise of hope, sunflower of my winter. Thirteen years of wishing in the quiet of the rain, perfumed cherry petals lonely in so lovely a place. The night begins to dawn, the laundry all gets done, time to see if you’ve written, the sky so many blues. Thirteen years is nothing, if you are in love, but you’re not in love with me. The opposites in the above poem are straightforward, like “night” and “dawn,” a

temple, you could blend a set of spiritual words in with a set of nature words. If I want to suggest that all faiths stem from the same source, I could use two faiths close to myself, such as Native spirituality and Christianity. I would then weave symbols from the sets of words in each faith into the imagery of my poem, perhaps comparing the traditional Cree Sun Dance with the cross, exploring the overall similarities that are expressed in unique ways. Symbols I treat writing and editing

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