HTML5 and CSS3: Develop with Tomorrow's Standards Today (Pragmatic Programmers)

HTML5 and CSS3: Develop with Tomorrow's Standards Today (Pragmatic Programmers)

Brian P. Hogan

Language: English

Pages: 261

ISBN: 1934356689

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

HTML5 and CSS3: Develop with Tomorrow's Standards Today (Pragmatic Programmers)

Brian P. Hogan

Language: English

Pages: 261

ISBN: 1934356689

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


HTML5 and CSS3 are the future of web development, but you don't have to wait to start using them. Even though the specification is still in development, many modern browsers and mobile devices already support HTML5 and CSS3. This book gets you up to speed on the new HTML5 elements and CSS3 features you can use right now, and backwards compatible solutions ensure that you don't leave users of older browsers behind.

This book gets you started working with many useful new features of HTML5 and CSS3 right away. Gone are the days of adding additional markup just to style a button differently or stripe tables. You'll learn to use HTML5's new markup to create better structure for your content and better interfaces for your forms, resulting in cleaner, easier-to-read code that can be understood by both humans and programs.

You'll find out how to embed audio, video, and vector graphics into your pages without using Flash. You'll see how web sockets, client-side storage, offline caching, and cross-document messaging can ease the pain of modern web development. And you'll discover how simple CSS3 makes it to style sections of your page. Throughout the book, you'll learn how to compensate for situations where your users can't take advantage of HTML5 and CSS3 yet, developing solutions that are backwards compatible and accessible.

You'll find what you need quickly with this book's modular structure, and get hands-on with a tutorial project for each new HTML5 and CSS3 feature covered. "Falling Back" sections show you how to create solutions for older browsers, and "The Future" sections at the end of each chapter get you excited about the possibilities when HTML5 and CSS3 reach widespread adoption. Get ready for the future---in fact, it's here already.

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separate by using linked style sheets. Using onclick is easy at first, but imagine a page with fifty links, and you'll see how the onclick method gets out of hand. You'll be repeating that JavaScript over and over again. And if you generate this code from some server-side code, you're just increasing the number of JavaScript events and making the resulting HTML much bigger than it needs to be. Instead, give each of the anchors on the page a class that identifies them. Down! oad

any form, or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior consent of the publisher. Printed In the United States of America. ISBN-10: 1-934356-68-9 ISBN-13: 978-1-934356-68-5 Printed on acid-free paper. P1.0 printing, December 2010 Version: 2011-1-4 Contents Acknowledgments 8 Preface HTML5: The Platform vs. the Specification How This Works What's in This Book Prerequisites Online Resources 10 10 11 12 12 13 1 14 14 17 17 An Overview of

designers have turned to different techniques over the years to add rounded corners to these elements to soften up the interface a bit. CSS3 has support for easily rounding corners, and Firefox and Safari have supported this for quite a long time. Unfortunately, Internet Explorer hasn't jumped on board yet. But we can get around that simply enough. Softening Up a Login Form The wireframes and mock-ups you received for your current project show form fields with rounded corners. Let's round those

cookieName+"="+escape(cookieValue) + "; expi res= " + e x p i re . t o G M T S t r i n g O ; } Aside from the hard-to-remember syntax, there are also the security concerns. Some sites use cookies to track users' surfing behavior, so users disable cookies in some fashion. HTML5 introduced a few new options for storing data on the client: Web Storage (using either localStorage or sessionStorage)1 and Web SQL Databases.2 They're easy to use, incredibly powerful, and reasonably secure. Best of

Defines a header region of a page or section. [C5, F3.6, IE8, S4, 010]
Defines a footer region of a page or section. [C5, F3.6, IE8, S4, Ol 0]