I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew

I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew

Dr. Seuss

Language: English

Pages: 72

ISBN: 0394800923

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew

Dr. Seuss

Language: English

Pages: 72

ISBN: 0394800923

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


 

A comic classic by Dr. Seuss with a message about bullying turns 50!

     Dr. Seuss tackles troubles--bullies, terrain, weather, war--in the rhyming classic I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew. When our hero stubs his toe, he decides to find a less troublesome place to live. Soon he's off on a journey "to the City of Solla Sollew, on the banks of the beautiful River Wah-Hoo, where they never have troubles! At least, very few." But between his encounters with the Midwinter Jicker and the Perilous Poozer of Pompelmoose Pass, he soon finds out that confronting his problems might actually be easier than running away from them. A funny story that can be read purely for entertainment, I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew is also a great choice for starting discussions about bullying and facing up to difficulties in life. Available for a limited time only with a peel-off 50th Anniversary Sticker on the cover, this is a great gift for any occasion that will inspire lots of conversation!

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Cataloging-in-Publication Data Geisel, Theodor Seuss. I had trouble in getting to Solla Sollew, by Dr. Seuss. New York, Random House [1965] I. Title. PZ8.3.G276I 65-23994 978-0-394-80092-9 (trade) — 978-0-394-90092-6 (lib. bdg.) eBook ISBN: 978-0-385-37936-6 Random House Children’s Books supports the First Amendment and celebrates the right to read. for Margaretha Dahmen Owens with love and with thanks I was real happy and carefree and young And I lived in a place called

Sollew On the banks of the beautiful River Wah-Hoo, Where they never have troubles, at least very few?” I had terrible trouble in staying alive. Then I saw an old pipe that said, “Vent Number Five.” I didn’t have time to find out what that meant, But the vent had a hole. And the hole’s where I went. Well . . . that vent where I went Was a sort of a funnel That led me down into A frightful black tunnel. The traffic down there Was a mess, I must say, With billions of birds

Going all the wrong way. They bumped me with bikes And they banged me with dishes. I ran into ladders, Beds, bottles and fishes. I skidded on garbage. I fell in a horn. Troubles! I wished I had never been born! I was down there three days in that bird-filled-up place. At least eight thousand times, I fell smack on my face. I injured three fingers, both thumbs and both lips, My shinbone, my backbone, my wishbone and hips! What’s more, I was starved. I had nothing to eat. And

chap at a doorway that shimmered and shined Waved me a wave that was friendly and kind. “Welcome!” he said as he gave me his hand. “Welcome, my son, to this beautiful land. Welcome to sweet, sunny Solla Sollew, Where we never have troubles. At least very few. As a matter of fact, we have only just one. Imagine! Just one little trouble, my son. And this one little trouble, As you will now see, Is this one little trouble I have with this key. . . . “There is only one door into

the next thing I knew, I was pulling the camel and Wubble chap, too! “Now, really!” I thought, “this is rather unfair!” But he said, “Don’t you stew. I am doing my share. “This is called teamwork. I furnish the brains. You furnish the muscles, the aches and the pains. I’ll pick the best roads, tell you just where to go And we’ll find a good doctor more quickly, you know.” Then he sat and he worked with his brain and his tongue And he bossed me around just because I was young. He

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