iOS 8 Programming Fundamentals with Swift: Swift, Xcode, and Cocoa Basics

iOS 8 Programming Fundamentals with Swift: Swift, Xcode, and Cocoa Basics

Language: English

Pages: 582

ISBN: 1491908904

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

iOS 8 Programming Fundamentals with Swift: Swift, Xcode, and Cocoa Basics

Language: English

Pages: 582

ISBN: 1491908904

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Move into iOS development by getting a firm grasp of its fundamentals, including the Xcode IDE, the Cocoa Touch framework, and Swift—Apple’s new programming language. With this thoroughly updated guide, you’ll learn Swift’s object-oriented concepts, understand how to use Apple’s development tools, and discover how Cocoa provides the underlying functionality iOS apps need to have.

  • Explore Swift’s object-oriented concepts: variables and functions, scopes and namespaces, object types and instances
  • Become familiar with built-in Swift types such as numbers, strings, ranges, tuples, Optionals, arrays, and dictionaries
  • Learn how to declare, instantiate, and customize Swift object types—enums, structs, and classes
  • Discover powerful Swift features such as protocols and generics
  • Tour the lifecycle of an Xcode project from inception to App Store
  • Create app interfaces with nibs and the nib editor, Interface Builder
  • Understand Cocoa’s event-driven model and its major design patterns and features
  • Find out how Swift communicates with Cocoa’s C and Objective-C APIs

Once you master the fundamentals, you’ll be ready to tackle the details of iOS app development with author Matt Neuburg’s companion guide, Programming iOS 8.

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Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487 Principles of Cocoa Memory Management Rules of Cocoa Memory Management What ARC Is and What It Does How Cocoa Objects Manage Memory Autorelease Pool Memory Management of Instance Properties Retain Cycles and Weak References Unusual Memory Management Situations Nib Loading and Memory Management Memory Management of CFTypeRefs Property Memory Management Policies Debugging Memory

side of countAdder is a new function, which we’ve named countedGreet. We then call countedGreet three times. Here’s what appears in the console: count is 1 howdy count is 2 howdy count is 3 howdy Clearly, countAdder has added to the functionality of the function that was passed into it the ability to report how many times it is called. Now ask yourself: Where on earth is the variable that maintains this count? Inside countAdder, it was a local variable ct. But it isn’t declared inside the

O’Reilly Media who have made writing a book so delightfully easy: Rachel Roumeliotis, Sarah Schneider, Kristen Brown, Dan Fauxsmith, and Adam Witwer come particularly to mind. And let’s not forget my first and long-standing editor, Brian Jepson, who had nothing whatever to do with this ed‐ ition, but whose influence is present throughout. Some details of the presentation of the Swift language came from suggestions by Andrew Duncan, whose book on Objective-C is a classic in its own right. As in

don’t have to give my properties initial values in their declarations, provided I give them initial values in all initializers. That way, I am guaranteed that all my instance properties have values when the instance comes into existence, which is what matters. Conversely, an instance property without an initial value when the instance comes into existence is illegal. A property must be initialized either as part of its declaration or by every ini‐ tializer, and the compiler will stop you

Object Types In this example, I improve my ListType enum so that it can be initialized with a String raw value without having to say rawValue: in the call. To do so, I declare a failable initializer with no parameters that delegates to the built-in failable rawValue: initializer: enum ListType : String { case Albums = "Albums" case Playlists = "Playlists" case Podcasts = "Podcasts" case Books = "Audiobooks" static var cases : [ListType] = [Albums, Playlists, Podcasts, Books] init!(_ ix:Int) {

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