iOS Hacker's Handbook

iOS Hacker's Handbook

Charlie Miller, Dion Blazakis, Dino DaiZovi, Stefan Esser, Vincenzo Iozzo

Language: English

Pages: 408

ISBN: 1118204123

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

iOS Hacker's Handbook

Charlie Miller, Dion Blazakis, Dino DaiZovi, Stefan Esser, Vincenzo Iozzo

Language: English

Pages: 408

ISBN: 1118204123

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Discover all the security risks and exploits that can threaten iOS-based mobile devices

iOS is Apple's mobile operating system for the iPhone and iPad. With the introduction of iOS5, many security issues have come to light. This book explains and discusses them all. The award-winning author team, experts in Mac and iOS security, examines the vulnerabilities and the internals of iOS to show how attacks can be mitigated. The book explains how the operating system works, its overall security architecture, and the security risks associated with it, as well as exploits, rootkits, and other payloads developed for it.

  • Covers iOS security architecture, vulnerability hunting, exploit writing, and how iOS jailbreaks work
  • Explores iOS enterprise and encryption, code signing and memory protection, sandboxing, iPhone fuzzing, exploitation, ROP payloads, and baseband attacks
  • Also examines kernel debugging and exploitation
  • Companion website includes source code and tools to facilitate your efforts

iOS Hacker's Handbook arms you with the tools needed to identify, understand, and foil iOS attacks.

Currents in Industrial Mathematics: From Concepts to Research to Education

Hacking Matter: Levitating Chairs, Quantum Mirages, and the Infinite Weirdness of Programmable Atoms

Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe

Wired for Innovation: How Information Technology Is Reshaping the Economy

Gramophone, Film, Typewriter (Writing Science)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys: (id)kSecClassGenericPassword, (id)kSecClass, @"MyItem", (id)kSecAttrGeneric, username, (id)kSecAttrAccount, password, (id)kSecValueData, [[NSBundle mainBundle] bundleIdentifier], (id)kSecAttrService, @"", (id)kSecAttrLabel, @"", (id)kSecAttrDescription, (id)kSecAttrAccessibleWhenUnlocked, (id)kSecAttrAccessible, nil]; OSStatus result = SecItemAdd((CFDictionaryRef)query, NULL); Attacking Data Protection To demonstrate the limitations of data protection and what

extern int MKBUnlockDevice(NSData* passcode, int flags); extern int MKBGetDeviceLockState(); extern int MKBDeviceUnlockedSinceBoot(); void usage(char* argv0) { fprintf(stderr, "usage: %s [ -B | -p ]\n", argv0); exit(EXIT_FAILURE); } int try_unlock(const char* passcode) { int ret; NSString* nssPasscode = [[NSString alloc] initWithCString:passcode]; NSData* nsdPasscode = [nssPasscode dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]; ret = MKBUnlockDevice(nsdPasscode, 0);

/private/var/tmp/container/1234/secret Dr. Ray Stantz: Total protonic reversal. iFauxn:∼/ioshh root# What has occurred in the transcript and how does it relate to the profile that was created? In the transcript, the program is started with the command-line argument /private/var/tmp/container/5678. This is used in the sandbox_init_with_extensions call. The first output you see is the result of a sandbox_issue_extension. The extension is issued for the 1337 subdirectory and occurs prior to sandbox

library is loaded, named OfficeImport. Later, when fuzzing, you can confirm this is the library that handles Office documents because you'll see crashes inside it. ... 165 OfficeImport F 0x38084000 dyld Y Y /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/OfficeImport.framework/ OfficeImport at 0x38084000 (offset 0x6c6000) /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/OfficeImport.framework/ OfficeImport" at 0x38084000] If you know OS X very well, you know that there is a way to preview Office documents, in Finder or as

frame inner to this frame (gdb could not unwind past this frame) (gdb) So the object is freed only after the Nitro garbage collector is invoked. It is pretty vital, then, to understand when and how the Nitro garbage collector is triggered. The Nitro garbage collector is invoked in three scenarios: After a timeout that is set at compile time After the JavaScript global data are destroyed (that is, when a thread dies) When the number of bytes allocated exceeds a certain threshold Clearly,

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