Impossibly Funky: A Cashiers Du Cinemart Collection

Impossibly Funky: A Cashiers Du Cinemart Collection

Mike White

Language: English

Pages: 390

ISBN: 1593935471

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Impossibly Funky: A Cashiers Du Cinemart Collection

Mike White

Language: English

Pages: 390

ISBN: 1593935471

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Harangue for Hollywood! From the blighted urban squalor of Detroit--Paris of the Midwest--came enfant terrible Mike White and his mutant publication, Cashiers du Cinemart. For fourteen years and fifteen issues the writers of Cashiers du Cinemart provided a treasure trove of writing on film and popular culture. This book collects the best articles from the fifteen year history of Cashiers du Cinemart magazine with sections dedicated to Quentin Tarantino, Star Wars, Black Shampoo, Unproduced screenplays, celebrity interviews, and much more. Everything has been refreshed, polished, and improved for this volume of movie mayhem.

Featuring articles by Leon Chase, Chris Cummins, Skizz Cyzyk, Andrew Grant, Clifton Howard, Rich Osmond, Mike Thompson, Andrea White, and Mike White.
Cover art by Jim Rugg and Jasen Lex. Illustrations by Dean Stahl, Pat Lehrner, and Jonathan Higgins.
Copy editing and layout by Lori Hubbard Higgins.

Star Wars on Trial: Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers Debate the Most Popular Science Fiction Films of All Time (Smart Pop Series)

Superheroes of the Round Table: Comics Connections to Medieval and Renaissance Literature

Philosophy in The Twilight Zone

The Routledge Companion to Video Game Studies

The Forgotten Village: Life in a Mexican Village

Wrong About Japan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

my take on the events that transpired is my own way of “playing the media.” I never lied or exaggerated about what happened during this period. I presented the facts the way I saw them. The NYUFF is an 19 Attention: Enemy institution, and they have to realize that it’s fair game. And, like I always say, bad press is better than no press! Phillips, Gurland, and I talked for a good twenty minutes. They so wished that I had talked to them about any misunderstandings while they were occurring,

clue to the idea that Lee Marvin’s character may not be quite alive. That is, he might very well be the walking dead. (Stark would later acknowledge this name in his The Black Ice Score by mentioning that Parker once operated under the pseudonym “Matthew Walker.”) The story’s setting has been taken from New York to another classic backdrop of film noir stories, Los Angeles. Up the coast a bit, Alcatraz is utilized for the island drop of The Hunter. The film begins with Walker taking two bullets

more “deep throat”). Yet that didn’t stop the dumb questions from coming (more on this later). After my second conversation, I’ve never talked to Chris Gore again. Chris now considered me persona non grata, though not enough to avoid showing my video at the ’94 Chicago Underground Film Festival (without my permission) or sending a copy to Lisa Kennedy at The Village Voice (“Gore was only too happy to FedEx me a copy marked ‘Evidence,’” Kennedy wrote), but enough to never return my calls, letters,

screen. His rational, I’m sure, is that he didn’t want to walk away from it—that it took courage to show the brutality. Or, it could just be that he just gets off on it. As the film continues, Welles manages to discover the name of the girl in the snuff film (requiring considerably less work in the film than in the script). From there he is able reach her mother, and searches her house for clues. After some digging, he finds the young girl’s diary. In the film it’s in the toilet (which is a

find it. In the film, however, Welles wants the mother’s permission to kill these men. Schumacher wants Welles, and the audience, to know that it’s okay to kill people if they really, really deserve it. And if the victim’s mother tells you to. In both script and film, Welles does go in and kill Eddie, but in the film he comes across like John Wayne, out to deal some American-style justice (we even get the cliché shot of our hero walking toward the camera, with burning chaos behind him), rather

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