In the Kitchen with A Good Appetite: 150 Recipes and Stories About the Food You Love

In the Kitchen with A Good Appetite: 150 Recipes and Stories About the Food You Love

Melissa Clark

Language: English

Pages: 464

ISBN: 1401323766

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

In the Kitchen with A Good Appetite: 150 Recipes and Stories About the Food You Love

Melissa Clark

Language: English

Pages: 464

ISBN: 1401323766

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


"Melissa Clark's recipes are as lively and diverse as ever, drawing on influences from Marrakech to Madrid to the Mississippi Delta. She has her finger on the pulse of how and what America likes to eat."
-Tom Colicchio, author of Craft of Cooking

"A Good Appetite," Melissa Clark's weekly feature in the New York Times Dining Section, is about dishes that are easy to cook and that speak to everyone, either stirring a memory or creating one. Now, Clark takes the same freewheeling yet well-informed approach that has won her countless fans and applies it to one hundred and fifty delicious, simply sophisticated recipes.

Clark prefaces each recipe with the story of its creation-the missteps as well as the strokes of genius-to inspire improvisation in her readers. So when discussing her recipe for Crisp Chicken Schnitzel, she offers plenty of tried-and-true tips learned from an Austrian chef; and in My Mother's Lemon Pot Roast, she gives the same high-quality advice, but culled from her own family's kitchen.

Memorable chapters reflect the way so many of us like to eat: Things with Cheese (think Baked Camembert with Walnut Crumble and Ginger Marmalade), The Farmers' Market and Me (Roasted Spiced Cauliflower and Almonds), It Tastes Like Chicken (Garlic and Thyme-Roasted Chicken with Crispy Drippings Croutons), and many more delectable but not overly complicated dishes.

In addition, Clark writes with Laurie Colwin-esque warmth and humor about the relationship that we have with our favorite foods, about the satisfaction of cooking a meal where everyone wants seconds, and about the pleasures of eating. From stories of trips to France with her parents, growing up (where she and her sister were required to sit on unwieldy tuna Nicoise sandwiches to make them more manageable), to bribing a fellow customer for the last piece of dessert at the farmers' market, Melissa's stories will delight any reader who starts thinking about what's for dinner as soon as breakfast is cleared away. This is a cookbook to read, to savor, and most important, to cook delicious, rewarding meals from.

Wood for Sheep: The Unauthorized Settlers Cookbook

Taming the Feast: Ben Ford's Field Guide to Adventurous Cooking

Margaret Fulton Cookbook: Revised And Updated Edition Of The Classic

Hearty Soups: A Collection of Homemade Soups

The Kimchee Cookbook: Fiery Flavors and Cultural History of Korea's National Dish

Totally Tomato Cookbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

is, I can’t really detect it. Instead the dish tastes deeply of green, grassy asparagus, caramelized, softened, and singed from the skillet. Now, I’ve made a lot of asparagus over the years. I’ve steamed it, roasted it, grilled it, sautéed it, butter-braised it. But not until I tried Chang’s version did I even think to panfry it. Once I did, though, I was a convert. All those other methods have their charms, but to me, panfrying combines the best attributes of them all. Like grilled and roasted

thyme, and roasted it at the same oven temperature I called for and everything?” “Well . . . almost.” In fact, she followed the recipe pretty closely, for her. But she used a cut-up chicken instead of a whole bird and stale whole wheat bread (though she did consider dipping into the stash of bagels she keeps in the freezer along with lox and cream cheese for spontaneous brunches). Her only profound deviation was to spread the bread with mustard. Mustard! It was a brilliant idea. Mustard

garlic-vinegar mixture and the cilantro or parsley. Serve the stew topped with fried bread. OVEN-ROASTED PORK BUTT WITH ROSEMARY, GARLIC, AND BLACK PEPPER Of all the pork roast recipes a person can prepare, few have the Paleolithic appeal of a roasted whole pig. Be it an infantine suckling or a man-size hog, roasting an entire animal in its recognizable form reduces the art of cooking to its earthiest incarnation, and unites the cook with her hunter-gatherer ancestors—even if hunting

in wine and lingonberry jam. And as a hearty vegetarian dish to offer our ever-widening circle of friends, Joe and I began making our own spaetzle, tiny egg-rich dumplings topped with browned onions and cheese. Actually, to say Joe and I made the spaetzle by ourselves would be misleading. The recipe we were using called for three pairs of hands—one pair to hold the colander over the boiling water, one pair to pour the batter into the colander, and one pair to constantly stir the water receiving

the top of the stuffing with more butter if baking in a pan. If using a baking pan, bake at 375°F until the top is light golden brown and the middle is almost set, 30 to 35 minutes. * * * NOTE: You can use a 14-ounce jar of peeled roasted chestnuts for this, or roast and peel your own chestnuts. My father uses the microwave. Working with about 5 chestnuts at a time, he slits each chestnut almost all the way around its circumference, leaving the shell connected in one spot (there is a black

Download sample

Download