In Translation: Translators on Their Work and What It Means

In Translation: Translators on Their Work and What It Means

Esther Allen

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 0231159692

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

In Translation: Translators on Their Work and What It Means

Esther Allen

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 0231159692

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The most comprehensive collection of perspectives on translation to date, this anthology features essays by some of the world's most skillful writers and translators, including Haruki Murakami, Alice Kaplan, Peter Cole, Eliot Weinberger, Forrest Gander, Clare Cavanagh, David Bellos, and José Manuel Prieto. Discussing the process and possibilities of their art, they cast translation as a fine balance between scholarly and creative expression. The volume provides students and professionals with much-needed guidance on technique and style, while affirming for all readers the cultural, political, and aesthetic relevance of translation.

These essays focus on a diverse group of languages, including Japanese, Turkish, Arabic, and Hindi, as well as frequently encountered European languages, such as French, Spanish, Italian, German, Polish, and Russian. Contributors speak on craft, aesthetic choices, theoretical approaches, and the politics of global cultural exchange, touching on the concerns and challenges that currently affect translators working in an era of globalization. Responding to the growing popularity of translation programs, literature in translation, and the increasing need to cultivate versatile practitioners, this anthology serves as a definitive resource for those seeking a modern understanding of the craft.

Writing the Paranormal Novel: Techniques and Exercises for Weaving Supernatural Elements Into Your Story.

Academic Writing: A Practical Guide for Students

Wild Things!: Acts of Mischief in Children's Literature

Secrets of Story Well Told: From Theme to Organic Storytelling (Screenwriting Blue Books)

Exploring Translation Theories (2nd Edition)

A Teacher's Guide To Wordsmith: A Creative Writing Course for Young People

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Around all you do or say”—with the rotations of this musica munda in turn leading me to register the final “discords” not simply as “discordant” (etymologically from dis + cor, apart + heart) but rather as the more explicitly musical “out of tune” (dis + chorda): Tu es le Corps, Dame, & ie suis ton vmbre, Qui en ce mien continuel silence Me fais mouuoir, non comme Hecate l’Vmbre, Par ennuieuse, & grande violence, Mais par pouoir de ta haulte excellence, En me mouant au doulx contournement

underrated force in the creation of literature). The introspective bookworm happily becomes the voice of Jack London or Jean Genet; translation is a kind of fantasy life. Translators are often asked to talk about their relationships with the authors they translate, and they tend to reply with sometimes amusing intertextual anecdotes. Authors, however, never talk about their translators, beyond a few passing complaints. This is because the author-translator relationship has no story. Or more

Porter.”26) Harriet de Onís’s translation career began in the late 1920s when her husband encouraged her to translate El águila y la serpiente, by Mexican novelist Martín Luis Guzmán. By coincidence, a few days later a friend who had landed a job at the prestigious publishing house of Alfred A. Knopf happened to call and ask her to translate it, as well. The context that produced such consensus on the need for a translation was strikingly similar to the one that resulted in Mary Mann’s

sold; they’ve been replaced by chrome-plated Western barbells with interchangeable disks. His cockroach moustache seems to snicker, Тараканьи смеются усища, In the original, literally: “His cockroach moustache laughs.” A childish image that echoes a beloved children’s poem by Korney Chukovsky in which a “huge and moustachioed cockroach” (usatii tarakanishe) terrorizes a forest’s animals until a “brave sparrow” faces him down and gobbles him up with a single peck of its beak. In her

appreciate if we cannot tolerate multiplicity. Stories like Detha’s are not created in a vacuum and are not meant to be read in a vacuum. They represent a particularly fruitful relationship with the various lok brought together in the stories—and here I mean lok in the sense of people or folk, but also in the sense of worlds. If we are serious in calling these stories lok katha, it behooves us to ask: Who are these lok, what, and where? Alan Dundes asks a similar question in the essay, “Who Are

Download sample

Download