Japanese Cybercultures (Asia's Transformations/Asia.com)

Japanese Cybercultures (Asia's Transformations/Asia.com)

Nanette Gottlieb

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 0415279194

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Japanese Cybercultures (Asia's Transformations/Asia.com)

Nanette Gottlieb

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 0415279194

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Japan is rightly regarded as one of the most technologically advanced countries in the world, yet the development and deployment of Internet technology in Japan has taken a different trajectory compared with Western nations. This is the first book to look at the specific dynamics of Japanese Internet use.

It examines the crucial questions:
* how the Japanese are using the Internet: from the prevalence of access via portable devices, to the fashion culture of mobile phones
* how Japan's "cute culture" has colonized cyberspace
* the role of the Internet in different musical subcultures
* how different men's and women's groups have embraced technology to highlight problems of harassment and bullying
* the social, cultural and political impacts of the Internet on Japanese society
* how marginalized groups in Japanese society - gay men, those living with AIDS, members of new religious groups and Japan's hereditary sub-caste, the Burakumin - are challenging the mainstream by using the Internet.

Examined from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives, using a broad range of case-studies, this is an exciting and genuinely cutting-edge book which breaks new ground in Japanese studies and will be of value to anyone interested in Japanese culture, the Internet and cyberculture.

The Rough Guide to the Philippines (Rough Guide to Philippines)

Pol Pot: Anatomy of a Nightmare

Routledge Handbook of Environment and Society in Asia

Yazhou gu bing qi tu shuo ???????

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

campaigns such as opposition to war, nuclear power plants or public works projects. That this potentially profound crumbling of old political realities is taking place at the same time as the rapid development of the Internet in Japan is significant, and might be seen as heralding a revival of a progressive politics hinged around networks of virtual communities and Netizens operating away from the old political center in Tokyo. Such a revival is an especially attractive notion for those on the

have resulted; there has yet to be a divorce. Similarly, no problems of stalking or violence have occurred. At a time when rural communities throughout the country are losing population in enormous number, Nakashibetsu has reversed the trend. In Kajitani’s opinion it is due to deai. This Internet platform has served as a powerful, productive tool for social engineering. DECODING DEAI Such cases are striking, but how representative are they? Just what is deai for the average, everyday user? To

are no perfect solutions for the dangers inherent in human intercourse. Chat-only encounter sites aim at full protection, but they can engender their own problems. As Mika explained: “if you sign into chat at the same time each day, you get used to the people who are there. You get to know them and even count on chatting with them. And then, one day, they’re not there any more. And you wonder: ‘what happened to them?’ You can’t find them … and you start to feel lonely.” For people yearning for

based on information gathered from international NGOs, including over forty 100 Junko R. Onosaka related links.26 The production of the No Terrorism – No War – No Violence site was a joint undertaking with VAWW-NET Japan, to which many people contributed. One woman said, “Japan is the only country to have had an atomic bomb dropped on it. Bush suggests he’ll use atomic bombs, and Koizumi supports Bush – we have to strongly oppose them.” A man wrote that “I totally support fem-net! Let me link

changing jobs (December 1997, Tenshoku o kurikaesu jibun); concern about the negative impact of workaholism on a future marriage partner (April 1998, 118 Romit Dasgupta Wâkuhorikku to kekkon); disillusionment with the lack of freedom within Japanese work culture (March 1999, Nihon no kaisha wa fujiyû da); concerns about the financial and personal ramifications of imminent middle-age lay-off (August 2000, Risutora saresô jibun); among a host of similar concerns relating to the workplace.

Download sample

Download