L.A. Son: My Life, My City, My Food

L.A. Son: My Life, My City, My Food

Roy Choi, Tien Nguyen, Natasha Phan

Language: English

Pages: 352

ISBN: 0062202634

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

L.A. Son: My Life, My City, My Food

Roy Choi, Tien Nguyen, Natasha Phan

Language: English

Pages: 352

ISBN: 0062202634

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Los Angeles: A patchwork megalopolis defined by its unlikely cultural collisions; the city that raised and shaped Roy Choi, the boundary-breaking chef who decided to leave behind fine dining to feed the city he loved—and, with the creation of the Korean taco, reinvented street food along the way.

Abounding with both the food and the stories that gave rise to Choi's inspired cooking, L.A. Son takes us through the neighborhoods and streets most tourists never see, from the hidden casinos where gamblers slurp fragrant bowls of pho to Downtown's Jewelry District, where a ten-year-old Choi wolfed down Jewish deli classics between diamond deliveries; from the kitchen of his parents' Korean restaurant and his mother's pungent kimchi to the boulevards of East L.A. and the best taquerias in the country, to, at last, the curbside view from one of his emblematic Kogi taco trucks, where people from all walks of life line up for a revolutionary meal.

Filled with over 85 inspired recipes that meld the overlapping traditions and flavors of L.A.—including Korean fried chicken, tempura potato pancakes, homemade chorizo, and Kimchi and Pork Belly Stuffed Pupusas—L.A. Son embodies the sense of invention, resourcefulness, and hybrid attitude of the city from which it takes its name, as it tells the transporting, unlikely story of how a Korean American kid went from lowriding in the streets of L.A. to becoming an acclaimed chef.

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could eat anything with salsa verde; now so can you. MAKES ALMOST 2 CUPS ¼ cup mirin ½ cup natural rice vinegar (not seasoned) ½ cup fresh mint leaves 1 cup roughly torn fresh cilantro ¼ cup fresh Thai basil leaves 3 garlic cloves, peeled ½ shallot, peeled 2 serrano chiles 1 jalapeño pepper Juice and grated zest of 1 lime 2 tablespoons roasted sesame seeds 2 tomatillos, charred ½ cup canola oil ½ cup olive oil ½ avocado Pinch of kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

down the state looking for games, hoping to find my luck: Fresno, San Jose, San Mateo, San Diego Indian Reservations. But I never found it. The pros knew, even as I didn’t, that I was a balloon leaking hot air. It was more than just losing that was brutal. Without the game, I couldn’t breathe. I suffocated in open air; my skin felt pierced by a trillion tiny needles; white noise congested my thoughts. I just needed to get my fix, to get back in there, to feel the felt on my fingers, the chips in

and add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil. Throw in the rice and heat it up, moving it all around until it becomes crispy. Add the soy sauce and sesame oil and mix to incorporate. Crack in the egg and mix it all around for a minute. Scoop the rice into a bowl and rinse the pan. Return the pan to the stove and heat it up on high. Add the 2 tablespoons oil. Season the shrimp with salt and pepper and, working in batches, sear them on 1 side for about 30 seconds. Then, and only then, turn them over to

Gastronomy 101.” Chef DeSantis was a certified master chef, a former military chef, a bad-ass muthafucka. He spoke in Shakespearean colloquialisms and walked like a panther. We were all amazed. And we learned. We learned about Carême; we learned about Escoffier. We learned about the brigade system, the history of food, the origins of dishes, how a knife is a carefully constructed balance of blade and handle. I felt like I was an assassin meeting a gun for the first time. Too soon, the

Zucchini Fritter Omelet, 320, 321 ABOUT THE AUTHORS ROY CHOI was born in Seoul, Korea, and raised in Los Angeles, California. He graduated from the Culinary Institute of America and went on to cook at the internationally acclaimed Le Bernardin. He was named Best New Chef by Food & Wine in 2010. Choi is the co-owner, cofounder, and chef of Kogi BBQ, as well as the restaurants Chego!, A-Frame, Sunny Spot, and POT. He lives in Los Angeles, California. TIEN NGUYEN writes regularly about Los

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