Learn iOS 8 App Development

Learn iOS 8 App Development

James Bucanek

Language: English

Pages: 768

ISBN: 1484202090

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Learn iOS 8 App Development

James Bucanek

Language: English

Pages: 768

ISBN: 1484202090

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Learn iOS 8 App Development is both a rapid tutorial and a useful reference. You'll quickly get up to speed with Swift (Apple's powerful new programming language), Cocoa Touch, and the iOS 8 SDK. It's an all-in-one getting started guide to building useful apps. You'll learn best practices that ensure your code will be efficient and perform well, earning positive reviews on the iTunes App Store, and driving better search results and more revenue.

The iOS 8 SDK offers powerful new features, and this book is the fastest path to mastering them--and the rest of the iOS SDK --for programmers with some experience who are new to iPhone and iPad app development. Many books introduce the iOS SDK, but few explain how to develop apps optimally and soundly. This book teaches both core Swift language concepts and how to exploit design patterns and logic with the iOS SDK, based on Swift and the Cocoa Touch framework.

Why spend months or years discovering the best ways to design and code iPhone and iPad apps when this book will show you how to do things the right way from the start?

  • Get an accelerated introduction to the Swift programming language.
  • Develop your first app using Xcode's advanced interface design tools.
  • Learn Xcode workflows as you walk through the process of developing real iOS apps.
  • Dive into the completed projects or develop your apps from scratch with step-by-step code.

Learn how to create apps for any model of iPhone, the iPod Touch, the iPad, or build universal apps that run on all of them. After reading this book, you'll be creating professional quality apps, ready to upload to the app store, making you the prestige and the money you seek!

What you'll learn

  • Develop simple to moderately complex iOS apps.
  • Add sound and iPod music playback, the camera, and photos to your app.
  • Connect your app to the world through Internet services, social networking, and cloud synchronization.
  • Plug into the latest mobile technologies: maps, GPS, accelerometer, gyroscope, and compass.
  • Polish your apps with elegant animation and effortless navigation.
  • Explore new iOS 8 features, like Sprite Kit and extensions.
  • Improve your app's quality with core design patterns and best programming practices.

Who this book is for

This book requires no prior iPhone or iOS app coding experience, but some comfort with programming in C or C-like language (Objective-C, C++, C#, Java) is assumed.

Table of Contents

  1. Got Tools?
  2. Boom! App
  3. Spin a Web
  4. Coming Events
  5. Table Manners
  6. Object Lesson
  7. Smile!
  8. Model Citizen
  9. Sweet, Sweet Music
  10. Got Views?
  11. Draw Me a Picture
  12. There and Back Again
  13. Sharing Is Caring
  14. Game On!
  15. If You Build It...
  16. Apps with Attitude
  17. Where Are You?
  18. Remember Me?
  19. Doc, You Meant Storag
  20. See Swift, See Swift Run
  21. Frame Up

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that have to be taken in order. Here’s a preview of the chapters ahead: Got Tools? shows you how to download and install the Xcode development tools. You’ll need those. Boom! App walks you through the core steps for creating an iOS app—no programming needed. Spin a Web creates an app that leverages the power of iOS’s built-in web browser. Coming Events discusses how events (touches, gestures, and movement) get from the device into your app and how you use them to make your app respond to the

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