Learn to Write Chinese Characters (Yale Language Series)

Learn to Write Chinese Characters (Yale Language Series)

Language: English

Pages: 123

ISBN: 0300057717

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Learn to Write Chinese Characters (Yale Language Series)

Language: English

Pages: 123

ISBN: 0300057717

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


An introductory manual for writing Chinese characters specifically designed for English-speaking readers. The author guides the reader through the fundamentals of writing, introduces the various scripts used in China and demonstrates how to write with a fountain pen rather than a brush.

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character contains, the harder it is to write. This general observation applies to ru, to enter, to go in, and ren, man, human, both of which depend on the fresh vigor of the na, the right leg: IA I I A.... 1 ru, to enter; to go in ren, man, human / ) A- J.... The character mil, mother, is written with a somewhat unusual stroke order. Note how the framework slants. If the character is written with straight angles, it loses life. Finally, let us look at the character nti, woman. The

to write, I have added detailed instructions on how to overcome the problems. The name of each radical is given in English and Chinese. You need not learn the Chinese names immediately, but the list will be handy to refer to when you do want to memorize them. Whereas the Chinese names usually have little or nothing to do with the history and development of the characters, the English names are more informative. For radicals that can be used independently as characters, I have included the

Ch'en Chih-Mai. A thorough discussion of the history of calligraphy with in-depth portraits of some of the great masters. The author also deals with aesthetics and appreciation of calligraphy, but gives little practical guidance on writing and does not analyze individual characters. (London and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1966.) Chinese Calligraphy by Lucy Driscoll and Kenji Toda. A brilliant exposition of calligraphy as an art form. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1935.) Chinese

sound in buzz; si sounds like szz, zi like dzz, and ci like tzz. In all other cases i is pronounced like the e in she. The letter 0 is usually pronounced like aw in saw; in ong, however, it is pronounced like 00 in soon. The letter ii is pronounced like the y at the beginning of English words. The word you, for example, is made up of a short, soft y sound followed by an 00: yoo. The Chinese ii sounds like this y. 117 The letter u is usually pronounced like ever, it is pronounced like ii. 00

person J 1 I:k.1 huo, fire " A- :r J:.. The fourth basic stroke is called na, It is rather hard to write. If pie is the left leg, then na is the right leg: 36 Here is how na looks in the character da, big: Note how na conveys the impression of a leg with a foot at the end and how this leg stabilizes the character. To write na, you should feel in the beginning as if you are striving upward and to the right, even though the stroke slopes downward the whole time. At the start of the

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