Learning Swift

Learning Swift

Language: English

Pages: 232

ISBN: 1784392502

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Learning Swift

Language: English

Pages: 232

ISBN: 1784392502

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Build a solid foundation in Swift to develop smart and robust iOS and OS X applications

About This Book

  • Practically write expressive, understandable, and maintainable Swift code
  • Discover and optimize the features of Swift to write cleaner and better code
  • This is a step-by-step guide full of practical examples to create efficient IOS applications

Who This Book Is For

If you are looking to build iOS or OS X apps using the most modern technology, this book is ideal for you. You will find this book especially useful if you are new to programming or if you have yet to develop for iOS or OS X.

What You Will Learn

  • Form a solid understanding of the Swift language
  • Learn the practical aspects of how a computer program actually works
  • Understand the paradigms used by Apple's frameworks and not be intimidated by them
  • Utilize the vast resources written in Objective-C to better inform your Swift programming
  • Develop a basic portfolio of Swift code, covering and practicing critical concepts
  • Discover resources to ensure you never stop becoming a better developer
  • Write and understand concise but expressive functional style code
  • Implement various Swift design patterns to solve real-world problems
  • Create your own generics for existing applications

In Detail

Swift is Apple's new programming language and the future of iOS and OS X app development. At its surface, Swift is easy to jump into, but it has complex elements that are critical to becoming proficient at turning an idea into reality.

Develop the skills and confidence to dive passionately into creating compelling, maintainable, and elegant apps in Swift. This book provides an approachable, step-by-step introduction into programming with Swift. Each topic is separated into comprehensive sections that are full of practical examples and easy-to-understand explanations. Each section builds on the previous topics to develop a comprehensive understanding of app development in Swift.

It begins by giving an overview of the key features with practical examples and progresses to more advanced topics that help differentiate the skillful developers from the mediocre ones. It covers topics, such as variables, optionals, closures, generics, and memory management. In addition, this book also covers the art of programming, such as maintainability, useful design patterns, and resources for furthering your knowledge. This all culminates in writing a basic iOS app that will get you well on your way to turning your own app ideas into a reality.

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Everything Is Connected – Memory Management 137 Computer data storage 138 File system 138 Memory 138 Value types versus reference types 139 Determining value type or reference type 140 Behavior on assignment 140 Behavior on input 142 Closure capture behavior 144 Automatic reference counting 146 Object relationships 147 Strong 147 Weak 149 Unowned 150 Strong reference cycles Between objects 150 151 Spotting 151 Fixing 155 With closures 156 Spotting 156 Fixing 157 Lost

have noticed that initializers follow a different pattern for parameter naming. By default, initializers require a label for all parameters. However, remember that this is only the default behavior. You can change the behavior by either providing an internal and external name or by using an underscore (_) as the external name. Structures are an incredibly powerful tool in programming. They are an important way that we, as programmers, can abstract away more complicated concepts. As we discussed

invitee a genre. Let's start by defining the structure with some properties: // InviteList.swift struct InviteList { var invited: [Invitee] = [] var pendingInvitees: [Invitee] init(invitees: [Invitee]) { srand(UInt32(clock())) self.pendingInvitees = invitees } } [ 71 ] One Piece at a Time – Types, Scopes, and Projects Instead of storing a single list of both invited and pending invitees, we can store them in two separate arrays. This makes selecting a pending invitee much easier. This code

inArray: typeList) // Cannot convert value of type '[MyType]' to expected // argument type '[_]' This is another case where the compiler can save us from ourselves. We can also add type constraints to our generic types. For example, if we tried to create a bag with our dictionary implementation without a constraint, we would get an error: struct Bag2 { var elements: [ElementType:Void] // Type 'ElementType' does not conform to protocol 'Hashable' } This is because the key of

important thing is that you keep in mind all of the relationships an object has. There should always be at least one strong reference as long as you still want the object around and of course, there should never be a strong reference cycle. [ 158 ] Chapter 7 With closures This actually can't happen with closures because, as we discussed before, you cannot refer to a closure weakly. If you try, the compiler will give you an error: class Ball2 { weak var onBounce: (() -> ())? // Error: 'weak'

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