Lighting Modern Buildings

Lighting Modern Buildings

Derek Phillips

Language: English

Pages: 248

ISBN: 0750640820

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Lighting Modern Buildings

Derek Phillips

Language: English

Pages: 248

ISBN: 0750640820

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This is an important book, written by one of the top lighting designers in the country. Written at the end of a career as an architect and lighting designer, the book draws on the experience gained while living through a period of intense lighting development, from 1956 up to the millenium. It bridges the gap between the present day architect and lighting engineer, from the viewpoint of the 'independent lighting designer'.

'Lighting Modern Buildings' documents the part played by the independent lighting designer, leading to a greater understanding by architects and lighting engineers of the importance of lighting in architectural design.

The book starts with an exploration of the basic human needs of vision and the perception of our exterior world...the intellectual and the physical...since this is what lighting is all about. To do this, it is necessary to trace the development of daylight from earliest times up to the present day; the starting point for any lighting design is the 'natural' source.

Whilst an essential understanding of the role of daylight is the beginning, a knowledge of the various forms and properties of artificial light is essential; not only at night but during the day. In early buildings, there was one form of light - daylight - during the day and another - artificial - at night. No attempt was made to integrate the two. The situation today is different; there are many reasons for this, not least in the possibilities of modern structure. The book therefore has extensive coverage of day and night lighting and how it is designed to provide optimum solutions in building design.

A major portion of Derek Phillips' book is devoted to 'design'. Sufficient technical detail is provided in the book to permit an understanding of the design principles of each scheme. Schemes illustrated vary from small domestic buildings, churches and workplace, to those devoted to leisure and sport. At the end of each section a series of conclusions are drawn leading to a philosophy of lighting design.

* Learn how to design optimum lighting solutions
* Understand how to bridge the gap between architects and lighting engineers
* Discover how to integrate natural and artificial light sources

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mechanically lowered to the ground level with special raising and lowering gear to enable a maintenance crew to clean and re-lamp. The gear and its support is expensive and will need to be fully investigated at the time of installation. Safety The design and installation of the lighting system may be the responsibility of an electrical consultant, but the overall safety of the building is still in the hands of the architect, and he must ensure the following: 1 The adequate safety of the light

lighting and sun control but also with acoustics, ventilation and heating. There is a relationship between savings in energy and integration of services and the future will no doubt see further advances in this field, advances which it is to be hoped will be architect-led. Part 2 This Page Intentionally Left Blank Introduction to Case Studies Part 2 of the book consists of 59 Case Studies of Buildings outlining the development of both daylighting and artificial lighting throughout the

walls with their sculptured stations of the cross. The whole interior glows with light, both during the day and at night, with the light always coming from the same direction so that no significant changes occur as the daylight fades. However, when a church service is planned after dark, the emphasis of the artificial lighting is directed onto the chancel area, creating a change of mood. During the day variety is provided by the changing exterior conditions, whilst at night it is provided by

electricity needs, and that the office space conforms to the desired comfort targets. The building is as yet unoccupied and the artificial lighting is to be installed as part of the fit-out to satisfy the occupiers’ requirements. However, it is likely to be a system of low-brightness fluorescent fittings giving 300–400 lux with either simple manual or automated controls. Detailed section through PV Wall (photography Studio E). Exterior to show PV wall (photography Studio E). Interior looking

12, April 1933). Exterior of the building during the day (Copyright Boots). Building of the Boots factory, designed by Sir Owen Williams, was started in 1927 when Lord Trent, the son of the founder of Boots, Jesse Boot, appointed the works planning committee to investigate the site in Beeston with a view to building the ‘Ideal factory.’ When the factory opened in Beeston in 1933 in the middle of the depression, it provided the architect with the opportunity to apply fresh ideas and to use

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