Lightspeed Magazine, Issue 26 (July 2012)

Lightspeed Magazine, Issue 26 (July 2012)

Language: English

Pages: 173

ISBN: 2:00083403

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Lightspeed Magazine, Issue 26 (July 2012)

Language: English

Pages: 173

ISBN: 2:00083403

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Edited by bestselling anthologist John Joseph Adams, every month Lightspeed brings you a mix of originals and reprints, and featuring a variety of authors—from the bestsellers and award-winners you already know to the best new voices you haven’t heard of yet. When you read Lightspeed, it is our hope that you’ll see where science fiction and fantasy comes from, where it is now, and where it’s going.

Our current publication schedule each month includes four pieces of original fiction and four fiction reprints, along with two feature interviews

Welcome to issue twenty-six of Lightspeed!

No Lightspeed news to report this month, but I do have a new anthology just out that features several stories culled from Lightspeed’s pages: Other Worlds Than These, a new reprint anthology of parallel worlds stories and portal fantasies. It’s published by Night Shade Books and is available now; to learn more, visit the anthology’s official website at http://johnjosephadams.com/other-worlds-than-these.

In other non-Lightspeed news, the new horror magazine that I mentioned last month—Nightmare—was successfully funded via Kickstarter. So thanks to everyone who pledged. (I’m sure many of the Nightmare supporters are also Lightspeed readers!) Look for Nightmare to debut in October this year, and meanwhile, pop on over to www.nightmare-magazine.com for more information and updates, and/or follow Nightmare on Twitter @nightmaremag.

And finally, just a reminder: Your last chance to vote for the Hugo Awards is July 31, so if you want to participate, be sure to cast your ballot! If you’re an attending or supporting member of this year’s Worldcon, you can vote: Visit chicon.org/hugo/vote.php for instructions.

Now, with that out of the way . . . this month, we have original science fiction from A. M. Dellamonica (“The Sweet Spot”) and 2012 Nebula Award finalist Jake Kerr (“Requiem in the Key of Prose”), along with SF reprints by legendary authors Joe Haldeman (“Four Short Novels”) and David Brin (“The Giving Plague”).

We also have original fantasy by Maria Dahvana Headley (“Give Her Honey When You Hear Her Scream”) and Aidan Doyle (“Ghost River Red”), with fantasy reprints by award-winning authors Theodora Goss (“Singing of Mount Abora”) and Peter S. Beagle (“Gordon, the Self-Made Cat”).

For our ebook readers, our ebook-exclusive novella is “Lune and the Red Empress” by Liz Williams and Alastair Reynolds, and we have excerpts of the exciting new SF novels vN by Madeline Ashby and Spin the Sky by Katy Stauber.

All that, plus our usual assortment of author and artist spotlights, and feature interviews with physicist Brian Green and bestselling author Garth Nix.

Our issue this month is again sponsored by our friends at Orbit Books. This month, look for God Save the Queen, the first volume of Kate Locke’s The Immortal Empire series. You can find more from Orbit—including digital short fiction and monthly ebook deals—at www.orbitbooks.net.

Little Jinx

Dream Story (Penguin Modern Classics)

Maggie: A Girl of the Streets and Other Short Fiction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

precious in appearance. She opened the grille. There would be an alarm, surely, electricity or hidden tripwires. But she could see nothing to prevent her taking the egg. She cast a coin across the floor, it skittered and rattled to a stop. Nothing moved, nothing sounded. Lune stepped into the shrine, and for long moments it was all she could do to slow her breath. It was one thing to break into the cathedral, another still to stand this close to the egg. Caught now, she could always claim that

others—they tried to see whether the information might not really be lost. And over the course of many years, they developed an idea that when an object falls into a black hole, yes indeed, it falls in, but a copy of all of its information content gets in some sense “smeared out” on the surface of the black hole, on the horizon of the black hole. Smeared out in some sense like a series of 0s and 1s, the way information is stored in a typical computer. And that idea would suggest that a

swam in the dark water, in just his shirt. I sat on the bank, striking the dulcimer, thinking of songs that he might like. He floated on his back, his hair spreading around his face like seaweed. “There seems to be no time here,” he said. “At home, I was expecting a person from Porlock. But here, I feel that no person from Porlock will ever come. Time has stopped, and nothing will ever happen. Except that you will keep singing, Sabra. You will keep singing, won’t you? Sing to me about how the

his tailcoat, unfastening his cufflinks, and rolling up his sleeves. There’s a little bit of fluffy bunny tail stuck at the corner of the witch’s mouth. He reaches out and plucks it from her lips. “Revenge,” she repeats. “Together forever. That’s what they want.” She pulls out a notebook. When she opens the cover, there’s a sound of wind and wings and stamping, and a low roar, growing louder. Something’s caged in there, in those pages. Something’s been feeding on forever. The magician smiles

tell us about your story, “The Giving Plague?” Back in the 1980s, biological science was abuzz with a new idea—that the boundaries between species aren’t anywhere near as firm and permanent as we (and Darwin) once thought. Bacteria exchange DNA with each other. Many of our own genes entered our chromosomes, originally, from viruses. Some species even hijack each other, as when a parasitic wasp lays her egg in an ant, who then behaves almost like a living vehicle, taking the growing larva where

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