Lightspeed Magazine, Issue 29 (October 2012)

Lightspeed Magazine, Issue 29 (October 2012)

Language: English

Pages: 166

ISBN: 2:00146607

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Lightspeed Magazine, Issue 29 (October 2012)

Language: English

Pages: 166

ISBN: 2:00146607

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Edited by bestselling anthologist John Joseph Adams, every month Lightspeed brings you a mix of originals and reprints, and featuring a variety of authors—from the bestsellers and award-winners you already know to the best new voices you haven’t heard of yet. When you read Lightspeed, it is our hope that you’ll see where science fiction and fantasy comes from, where it is now, and where it’s going.

Our current publication schedule each month includes four pieces of original fiction and four fiction reprints, along with two feature interviews

Welcome to issue twenty-nine of Lightspeed!

As I write this, I’m just back from Worldcon and the Hugo Awards, where I lost not one but two Hugos (and for the second year in a row!). But what they say is true: it truly is an honor to be nominated. Congratulations to all of the winners and other nominees.

Speaking of award nominations, we have one more nomination to announce: I’ve again been nominated for the World Fantasy Award, at least in part for my work on Fantasy, Lightspeed’s former sister-magazine, which—to paraphrase those great philosophers, the Borg—we later assimilated and added its creative distinctiveness to our own. The rest of the nominees are available here: worldfantasy.org/awards.

But the big news this month is that on October 1, we’ll be debuting Lightspeed’s new sister-magazine, Nightmare. If you enjoy horror and dark fantasy, be sure to check it out. Our first issue features four all-new stories by Laird Barron, Sarah Langan, Jonathan Maberry, and Genevieve Valentine, and upcoming issues will contain new fiction from the likes of Ramsey Campbell, Jeff VanderMeer, Daniel H. Wilson, and many others. Just visit www.nightmare-magazine.com, and either read it for free online, or buy one of our ebook editions—or subscribe!

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With all that out of the way, here’s what we’ve got on tap this month:

We have original fantasy by L.B. Gale (“Spindles”) and Megan Arkenberg (“The Suicide’s Guide to the Absinthe of Perdition”), and fantasy reprints by David Barr Kirtley (“The Black Bird”) and Brian Ruckley (“Beyond the Reach of His Gods”).

Plus, we have original science fiction by Robert Reed (“Flowing Unimpeded to the Enlightenment”) and Benjamin Parzybok (“Bear and Shifty”), along with SF reprints by Pat Cadigan (“Nearly Departed”) and Nancy Kress (“Art of War”).

For our ebook readers, our ebook-exclusive novella is “Dragonfly” by Ursula K. Le Guin, and of course we have our usual assortment of author and artist spotlights, along with feature interviews with Ursula K. Le Guin and David Brin. And our excerpt this month is from Gwenda Bond’s debut YA novel, Blackwood.

The Search for Sam (Lorien Legacies: The Lost Files, Book 4)

The Wiley Blackwell Anthology of African American Literature, Volume 1: 1746-1920 (Blackwell Anthologies)

The Pearl

Beyond the Door

Dead Aim

Clarkesworld: Year Five, Issues 49-60 (December 2013)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

child, Rose had seen something more in her, something beyond what she was. And when Irian looked away from the world like that, she seemed to enter that place or time or being beyond herself, utterly beyond Rose’s knowledge. Then Rose feared her, and feared for her. “You take care,” the witch said, grim. “Everything’s perilous, right enough, and meddling with wizards most of all.” Through love, respect, and trust, Dragonfly would never disregard a warning from Rose; but she was unable to see

his mortality, defenseless. She drew a long, long breath. She stepped back from him. The sense of huge strength was draining out of her. She turned her head a little and looked down, surprised to see her own brown arm, her rolled-up sleeve, the grass springing cool and green around her sandaled feet. She looked back at the Patterner and he still seemed a fragile being. She pitied and honored him. She wanted to warn him of the peril he was in. But no words came to her at all. She turned round and

his mortality, defenseless. She drew a long, long breath. She stepped back from him. The sense of huge strength was draining out of her. She turned her head a little and looked down, surprised to see her own brown arm, her rolled-up sleeve, the grass springing cool and green around her sandaled feet. She looked back at the Patterner and he still seemed a fragile being. She pitied and honored him. She wanted to warn him of the peril he was in. But no words came to her at all. She turned round and

designs and ideas come to fruition. What have been some of the most significant changes you’ve seen in your work since you started at the Academy of Art University? My work has gotten better in every regard since I started at the Academy of Art. The greatest things I have learned in my time here are anatomy, color theory, and a much better understanding of light. This school is a magnificent resource, and I’ve learned an absurd amount here. Are there particular properties you’d like to

for another garbanzo in the can. I offered the can to Shifty and elbowed him, “Come on, you try it. Talk a bean. It’ll make you feel better.” He must have thought I was mocking him, because I was wrong about the fighting. A while later, when I was loading up, he put a knife in my back. I leaned against the grover with it stuck out of my shoulder blade and swore a spell. Roger held his gun on him, and even then Shifty demonstrated his lack of mental acuity as he tried to go after Roger with

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