Living with Bipolar: A Guide to Understanding and Managing the Disorder

Living with Bipolar: A Guide to Understanding and Managing the Disorder

Language: English

Pages: 312

ISBN: 1741754259

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Living with Bipolar: A Guide to Understanding and Managing the Disorder

Language: English

Pages: 312

ISBN: 1741754259

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Analyzing an ailment that affects more than half of those suffering from depression, this reference provides practical and comprehensive information about bipolar disorder. Formerly known as manic depression, its mood swings can be extraordinarily disturbing for both the sufferers and those around them. This resource outlines the characteristics of the two main forms—Bipolar I and Bipolar II—their causes and triggers, treatment options, and ways of preventing relapses. With strategies for coping with symptoms and advice for living a healthy lifestyle, this handbook will prove invaluable to those suffering from bipolar disorder as well as their family and friends.

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have bipolar disorder than children of parents who do not have bipolar disorder. Yet that fact alone does not prove a genetic cause. Identical twins share all their genes. In twin studies, identical twins are compared with non-identical twins who, like other brothers or sisters, share about half of their genes. When one identical twin has bipolar disorder, the other has a 60 to 80 per cent chance of also having it. In siblings or non-identical twins, the risk is only about 20 per cent (Smoller &

symptoms, it is vital to take your mood into consideration when considering what to expect of yourself. Rani explains, ‘Cooking my family a basic meal when I am becoming depressed is as difficult as preparing a fancy cordon bleu dinner party when I am well.’ What will help you to feel a sense of mastery is to know that you have completed something you set out to do, even if it is a step towards a task and not the task itself. The trick is to set goals that are smaller than usual, but still

activities. A common symptom of depression is to be only ‘half-present’ when you are doing something. Your focus is on your depression and your worries, rather than the task at hand. It is a bit like trying to ride a bike with no hands on the handlebars. Doing things with awareness involves a hands-on approach, focusing on what you are doing in the moment (Linehan, 1993). It is putting your attention into the activity itself—for example, if you are making a cup of tea, being aware of the steps

factors when you become hypomanic. This goes together with extreme thinking, so you set rigid standards that others ‘should’ be able to meet. An example of such an ‘extreme should’ is, ‘You should always share my opinion or you are not my friend’. It also can be accompanied by harsh labelling in which the other person is stereotyped, such as ‘You are an idiot’. Aiming for a more holistic view of the person and examining the unrealistic expectations and other factors that contribute to such

between bipolar and unipolar depression. Clin Psychol Rev, 25, 307–39. De Hert, M., Thys, E., Magiels, G. & Wyckaert, S. (2004) Anything or nothing: self guide for people with bipolar disorder, Antwerp, Uitgeverij Houtekiet. Deegan, P.E. (1994) ‘Recovery: the lived experience of rehabilitation’ in Readings in psychiatric rehabilitation, W.A. Anthony & I. Spaniol (eds), pp. 142–62, Boston, Boston University, Centre for Psychiatric Rehabilitation. Dore, G. & Romans, S.E. (2001) Impact of bipolar

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