Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-1979

Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-1979

Tim Lawrence

Language: English

Pages: 528

ISBN: 0822331985

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-1979

Tim Lawrence

Language: English

Pages: 528

ISBN: 0822331985

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Opening with David Mancuso’s seminal “Love Saves the Day” Valentine’s party, Tim Lawrence tells the definitive story of American dance music culture in the 1970s—from its subterranean roots in NoHo and Hell’s Kitchen to its gaudy blossoming in midtown Manhattan to its wildfire transmission through America’s suburbs and urban hotspots such as Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Newark, and Miami.

Tales of nocturnal journeys, radical music making, and polymorphous sexuality flow through the arteries of Love Saves the Day like hot liquid vinyl. They are interspersed with a detailed examination of the era’s most powerful djs, the venues in which they played, and the records they loved to spin—as well as the labels, musicians, vocalists, producers, remixers, party promoters, journalists, and dance crowds that fueled dance music’s tireless engine.

Love Saves the Day includes material from over three hundred original interviews with the scene's most influential players, including David Mancuso, Nicky Siano, Tom Moulton, Loleatta Holloway, Giorgio Moroder, Francis Grasso, Frankie Knuckles, and Earl Young. It incorporates more than twenty special dj discographies—listing the favorite records of the most important spinners of the disco decade—and a more general discography cataloging some six hundred releases. Love Saves the Day also contains a unique collection of more than seventy rare photos.

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angels engaging in various forms of sexual intercourse—served an injunction against the venue a couple of days after it opened. The Church would have probably survived in its original incarnation if Lord’s first name had been The rather than Arnie, but it wasn’t, and so the proprietor reluctantly renamed his discotheque and, in a compromise move, placed clusters of plastic fruit over the more explicit parts of the mural. The injunction was lifted within a week, the less inflammatory yet grander

far superior. He gave the crowd what it wanted. He put your balls up your ass.” That experience wasn’t as painful as it might have been. “Michael Brody installed wooden floors and walls that could move with the bass and help sustain the dancers,” says DePino. “You could feel the floor moving up and down.” Yet there could nevertheless be no distance from this type of sound, which vibrated across the skin and through the bodies of dancers. “The Garage,” says François Kevorkian, who was introduced

François Kevorkian, 349, 355–56, 358, 359, 361, 411; and Frankie Knuckles, 47, 48, 129–33, 297–98, 440; and Danny Krivit, 295, 356, 357, 359; and Jorge La Torre, 129–30, 132, 356, 359, 360; Le Jardin, 115; Loft (Broadway) 48–49, 103, 197, 298, 345, 418; Loft (Prince Street), 429; and David Mancuso, 131, 133, 198, 292–93, 346, 352, 359, 361, 411; music, 132, 344–46, 348, 350–51 (discography: Paradise Garage 1977–78), 353, 355–56, 365, 369, 412–13 (discography: Paradise Garage 1979), 428, 438; New

friends or your enemies. A lot of the people who stayed in the Pines couldn’t really afford to be there.” Relative poverty, however, failed to puncture the pervasive atmosphere of snootiness. “I felt that a lot of the Fire Island Pines mentality was elitist and that resulted in a form of exclusion,” adds Brezner. “Sometimes it was wonderful being with other people of the same sexual persuasion in an environment where there was no prejudice or judgment, but that was only on the surface. For the

enlightened throng. “The booth was directly in front of a stained glass window, so early in the morning, when the first rays of the sun would come through, you would think that Francis was a priest and we were his congregation—because it used to get like that.” The situation was unsustainable. Toward the end of March 1972 the state attorney general described the discotheque as “a menace to the community” and “a supermarket for drugs.” Seeking a state supreme court order to close the club, he

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