Managing Your Depression: What You Can Do to Feel Better (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book)

Managing Your Depression: What You Can Do to Feel Better (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book)

Susan J. Noonan

Language: English

Pages: 184

ISBN: 142140947X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Managing Your Depression: What You Can Do to Feel Better (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book)

Susan J. Noonan

Language: English

Pages: 184

ISBN: 142140947X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


As a physician who personally suffers from depression, Susan J. Noonan draws on her own expertise and empathy to create a guide for people who suffer from the disease. Explaining the basics of mental health―including sleep hygiene, diet and nutrition, exercise, routine and structure, and avoiding isolation― Managing Your Depression empowers people to participate in their own care, offering them a better chance of getting, and staying, well. Noonan’s depression management strategies draw on the best available educational resources, psychoeducational programs, seminars, expert health care providers, and patient experiences.

The book is specifically designed to be highly readable for people who are finding it difficult to focus and concentrate during an episode of depression. Cognitive exercises and daily worksheets help track progress and response to therapy and provide valuable information for making treatment decisions. A relapsing and remitting condition, depression affects nearly 15 percent of people in the United States. Managing Your Depression will bring depression management strategies to people who do not have access to mental health programs or who want to learn new skills.

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depressed, you may withdraw from friends and family or feel too irritable to be with people. You may often be unable to concentrate and function well at work or school. Being manic or hypomanic is like having a storm inside your head. Your thoughts and speech race from topic to topic without completing a thought. You may be too disorganized and distracted to function well without realizing it at the time. In fact, when manic, you might think that you can do anything you choose, and that you have

it as an illustration. In a scene from the movie Bull Durham, the baseball character played by the actor Kevin Costner gives us a modified version of this exercise when he confidently states: “I believe in the soul, … the hanging curve ball, high fiber, good scotch … I believe there ought to be a constitutional amendment outlawing Astroturf and the designated hitter … I believe in … opening your presents Christmas morning rather than Christmas Eve.” He continues on to further list his preferences

think that you are capable of making a reasonable decision—your depressed brain is telling you to go ahead with it. His plea was to wait until I was feeling better to make any major life decisions. He was clever, because of course, when you are feeling better, you do not want to give up! So, in this way he got me to keep going and not give up. Feelings are not fact. Interpretation is not fact. Judgment is not fact. STOP. Look at the facts. Then modify your assessment/interpretation of the

That is not easy to do. Once you decide that you can trust and believe the other person, then you can accept their words as accurate and complimentary. There is Hope because … we see you in a different way than you see yourself, and if you were to see yourself as we see you, then you could believe and hope that life could be different. I was struggling terribly with the idea of having no hope for a life when this wise psychiatrist said this to me. I had to learn and later accept that he saw me

to Assertiveness. Alpha Books, 1997. Debra Fine. The Fine Art of Small Talk. Small Talk Publishers, 2002. A. Yeung, G. Feldman, and M. Fava. Self-Management of Depression: A Manual for Mental Health and Primary Care Professionals. Cambridge, 2010, app. C. Index About Me (form), 56 acceptance, 65, 115 action plan for relapse prevention, 63, 67, 68, 72, 74, 76, 77, 109, 119, 145 Action Plan for Relapse Prevention (form), 82–85 Sample Completed Action Plan (form), 78–81 Activities and

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