Martial Arts and Philosophy: Beating and Nothingness (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Martial Arts and Philosophy: Beating and Nothingness (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Graham Priest, Damon A. Young

Language: English

Pages: 189

ISBN: 0812696840

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Martial Arts and Philosophy: Beating and Nothingness (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Graham Priest, Damon A. Young

Language: English

Pages: 189

ISBN: 0812696840

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Martial arts and philosophy have always gone hand in hand, as well as fist in throat. Philosophical argument is closely paralleled with hand-to-hand combat. And all of today’s Asian martial arts were developed to embody and apply philosophical ideas. In his interview with Bodidharma, Graham Priest brings out aspects of Buddhist philosophy behind Shaolin Kung-Fu — how fighting monks are seeking Buddhahood, not brawls. But as Scott Farrell’s chapter reveals, Eastern martial arts have no monopoly on philosophical traditions: Western chivalry is an education in and living revival of Aristotelian ethical theories. Several chapters look at ethical problems raised by the fighting arts. How can the sweaty and brutal be exquisitely beautiful? Every chapter is easily understandable by readers new to martial arts or new to philosophy.

The Stations of the Sun: A History of the Ritual Year in Britain

The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D'oh! of Homer (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Downton Abbey and Philosophy: The Truth Is Neither Here Nor There (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series)

30 Rock and Philosophy: We Want to Go to There (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series)

The Walking Dead and Philosophy: Shotgun. Machete. Reason. (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series)

Most Talkative: Stories from the Front Lines of Pop Culture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

increasing speed, so the perception and the response flow seamlessly. In other words, training fills the gap between knowledge of relevant features and appropriate responses on the one hand, and actually seeing, and responding to, all of these features at once, on the other. In other words, training allows us to “Do as Yagyu would do,” without having to think about them at the time. Training combines wide, keen perception, with appropriate action—and because it is based on a model (like Yagyu),

asked for nor accepted. Students either perform well or they do not. It would make little sense for a martial artist to claim that he or she knows a particular kata, but has never had ample time to practice, so cannot actually perform it. The Sartrean martial artist claims that knowledge of a technique is nothing other than the ability to demonstrate it. Until the student performs well, it does not makes sense to refer to his or her abilities. And this goes for most martial arts: the

millennia. Of Shadows and Light, and Other Opposites Philosophers enjoy thinking about contrasts and contradictions. Aristotle (384-322 B.C.E.) even formulated a law of non-contradiction : he held that a thing cannot both be and not be in the same respect at the same time. This way of thinking runs deep in philosophy: just as a fighter cannot retreat defensively and move forward in attack at the same time, so it is thought that a philosophical argument will hit a wall as soon as it allows

You’re wicked!” Monkey departed in a huff. (From Wu Cheng-en, The Journey to the West, Chicago University Press, 1977.) Can a martial artist, someone who practices budo, be a Buddhist? Many martial artists have called themselves Buddhists, of course. What I’m asking about is the extent to which the two are morally compatible. There certainly seems to be an incompatibility—as the story of Monkey illustrates. A central precept of Buddhism, part of the Eightfold Way, is Take No Life. This has been

has experienced this moment of breakthrough. It’s the sudden, freeing flow of the techniques: a series of discrete movements, combined into a single moment and mood; the hard, linear punches and kicks alongside the soft, expanding circles; the combination of the Yang (the hard and linear) and the Yin (soft and circular) make the form beautiful. The Birth of Beauty The German philosopher and poet Friedrich Nietzsche explained this aesthetic in his book The Birth of Tragedy out of the Spirit

Download sample

Download