Mastering Type: The Essential Guide to Typography for Print and Web Design

Mastering Type: The Essential Guide to Typography for Print and Web Design

Denise Bosler

Language: English

Pages: 240

ISBN: 1440313695

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Mastering Type: The Essential Guide to Typography for Print and Web Design

Denise Bosler

Language: English

Pages: 240

ISBN: 1440313695

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Good Design, Down to the Letter

Packages on store shelves, posters on building walls, pages of a website—all contain information that needs to be communicated. And at the heart of that communication is type: visually interesting, interactive, expressive and captivating. Each letter must come alive; therefore, each letter must be carefully crafted or chosen. A solid foundation in typography, as well as an understanding of its nuances, will help you optimize your visual communication—in whatever form it takes.

By breaking down the study of type into a systematic progression of relationships—letter, word, sentence, paragraph, page and screen—award-winning graphic designer and professor of communication design Denise Bosler provides a unique and illuminating perspective on typography for both print and digital media and for designers of all skill levels.

Through instruction, interviews and real-world inspiration, Mastering Type explores the power of each typographic element--both as it stands alone and as it works with other elements--to create successful design, to strengthen your skill set and to inspire your next project.

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or using the automated optical alignment functions found in design software. Hanging punctuation is also necessary for quotation marks, question marks, hyphens, commas, periods and exclamation points in justified and right-aligned text. There is debate as to whether hanging punctuation is necessary in smaller paragraph text. If the page only has one or two paragraphs, most designers choose to hang the punctuation. If the page or document has multiple paragraphs or pages of paragraphs, then most

language is derived. Twenty-six simple little characters give us the ability to communicate with one another. Each character is unique—it has its own sound, its own shape, its own characteristics and its own rules for use. Understanding these characters individually is necessary to learning how to use typography. Without a proper understanding of the characters that make up a word, sentence or paragraph, a designer cannot properly create good typographic design, which is key to good communication

necessity. As the nineteenth-century English philosopher Alfred North Whitehead said, “The major advances in civilization are the processes that all but wreck the societies in which they occur.” Personally I have been exploring eBooks and find them wanting, but they are rife with possibilities. I think simply trying to mimic a printed book is the wrong way to approach it; rather, it should be viewed as a new way to tell your story. What are your influences? Where do you go for inspiration? My

standard fonts found across device platforms that are guaranteed to be viewable in any screen-based design: Arial, Helvetica, Times New Roman and Courier (Fig. 5). Most devices can also display Georgia, Verdana and Trebuchet, though these fonts are not yet fully integrated into all devices’ systems. There are also very generic fonts available, known as sans serif, serif, monospace and cursive. At a minimum, body copy should be set in an open-system–safe font to assure that it can be read on any

and logos. These typefaces tend to read well at larger sizes but are illegible when smaller or when used in long line lengths of text. Characteristics can include experimental, distressed and handwritten elements. Many budding type designers tackle these kinds of typefaces first because they don’t have to be as accurate or well formed as the other classifications. Additionally, many budding graphic designers overuse and misuse Display typefaces. It is best to exhibit restraint and use Display

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