Media Makeover: Improving The News One Click at a Time (Kindle Single) (TED Books)

Media Makeover: Improving The News One Click at a Time (Kindle Single) (TED Books)

Alisa Miller

Language: English

Pages: 31

ISBN: B0057ZEENC

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Media Makeover: Improving The News One Click at a Time (Kindle Single) (TED Books)

Alisa Miller

Language: English

Pages: 31

ISBN: B0057ZEENC

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


On average, many of us spend more than 70 minutes per day consuming news. That’s double the amount of time we spend caring for loved ones. How is it that we know so little about something that is such a big part of our lives? Alisa Miller, CEO of Public Radio International and media and technology leader, urges us to be aware and take control of the news if we want a more accurate picture of the world. "Media Makeover" is an entertaining and informative bird’s eye view of how “news” is made, what is missing from our news diets, why certain types of content are harder to come by, the implications for our society, and perhaps most importantly, what can be done about it. "Media Makeover" is a must-read for anyone who wants to be better informed and to take action: consumers, innovators, technologists, journalists, and media leaders alike.

“Alisa Miller shows how we need to take care of our News diet as much as our Food diet - an important book for all who care about how we learn about the world."
--Richard Sambrook, Former Director of BBC Global News and Visiting Fellow of the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"TV news is junk, utter wasted, distracting, useless junk. It's not going to get better unless we speak up, and Alisa Miller is doing just that."
--Seth Godin, Author of We Are All Weird

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consumers in the process.50 The service combines a community of professional journalists and concerned newsies to rate and review content and sources, and the power of algorithms to support the ratings process. People post stories they believe are accurate, incisive and well-written; these stories are then evaluated by professional journalists and trusted raters. Then the algorithm kicks in and helps to keep track of ratings over time to identify the best sources. The system also rates the

level of individual sentences, which words which media sources are using to talk about which topics. And finally, we have a set of tools for analyzing those word counts, including the Media Dashboard tool that acts as the front page for http://mediacloud.org.51 Check out this site at least once a week (and certainly during news-rubbernecking episodes.) As a whole, does this news agenda ring true to you? Another great real-time visualization of the news agenda is Newsmap. Created by Marcos

The technologist, thought leader and blogger Ethan Zuckerman summarized research comparing broadcast and online news polarization in this way: Matthew Gentzkow and Jesse Shapiro [of the University of Chicago] studied the online reading habits of thousands of US internet users28 and concluded that while some internet sites have a great deal of partisan separation, the news sites most visited by internet users (Yahoo! News, CNN, AOL News, MSNBC) were visited both by left and right-leaning users.

Knows.” Unfortunately, Pew’s results are similar to those featured on the popular Jaywalking segment on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. Jay regularly ventures out onto the streets of Los Angeles and asks random passers-by basic questions regarding important people or current events. Few know the answers. Using a common school-grading scale in which 90 percent correct equals an A, 80 percent receives a B, and so on, Americans did not fare well on the Pew survey, averaging a failing grade.

Figure 9. Americans flunk understanding the world. In July 2010, Pew found: The public continues to struggle in identifying political figures, foreign leaders and even knowing facts about key government policies. Only about a third of Americans (34%) know that the government’s bailout of banks and financial institutions was enacted under the Bush administration. Nearly half (47%) incorrectly say that the Troubled Asset Relief Program—widely known as TARP—was signed into law by President

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