Meditation - The Complete Guide: Techniques from East and West to Calm the Mind, Heal the Body, and Enrich the Spirit (Revised Edition)

Meditation - The Complete Guide: Techniques from East and West to Calm the Mind, Heal the Body, and Enrich the Spirit (Revised Edition)

Patricia Monaghan, Eleanor G. Viereck

Language: English

Pages: 312

ISBN: 2:00248804

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Meditation - The Complete Guide: Techniques from East and West to Calm the Mind, Heal the Body, and Enrich the Spirit (Revised Edition)

Patricia Monaghan, Eleanor G. Viereck

Language: English

Pages: 312

ISBN: 2:00248804

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


EPUB eISBN: 9781608681143
Original (1st edition) publication: 1999
Revised edition publication (electronic and print): 2011

Uniquely comprehensive, this one-stop resource describes thirty-?ve distinct meditation practices, detailing their historical background and contemporary use, ways to begin, and additional resources. The what and why of meditation in general are discussed, with emphasis on helping readers discover what particular type of meditators they are. Disciplines grounded in Buddhism, Tantrism, Taoism, Judaism, and Islam are included, as are contemplative prayer, Quaker worship, and indigenous traditions. Drumming, trance dancing, yoga, mindfulness, labyrinth walking, gardening, and even needle crafts are explored in a spirit that invites and instructs novice, devotee, and healing professional alike. How to choose an approach? The authors ask questions that steer readers toward options that match their habits, preferences, and needs.

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on your journey, use each moment as part of the meditative process. Continue the searching that began before your departure. Many pilgrims find that simple rituals — lighting a candle every night, writing in a journal each morning, praying or meditating in specific ways and at specific times — deepen the experience. Meditation is the art of living in the present. Distancing yourself from your daily routine makes this both more difficult and easier. You may easily become absorbed in the challenges

a cobweb and let your inner child’s body, your new body, fill the space of the room. Feel the freedom of your inner child. Imagine that your body is an ice cube melting on a hot sidewalk. Remain in the savasana pose as long as you like. It is fine to practice this pose in bed before you go to sleep. Even five minutes of deep relaxation on your back will restore your well-being. As you practice relaxing, you will grow more skillful at relaxing quickly and deeply. The savasana pose will refresh

embody their poetic insights in images: “No ideas but in things.” The haiku requires the same from its practitioner. Finding the exact expression for a fleeting insight by clothing it in natural images is a rewarding activity, even when language and form seem to struggle against each other. In Japan, haiku societies still flourish, with an estimated six million poets actively engaged in the art. Some American poets, often those intrigued by poetic form, have written syllabic verse, including

reported 42 percent of all the world’s Jews. Of the remainder, all but 16 percent live in the United States and Canada; most of the others live in Europe. (Other figures suggest that the diaspora population, the number of Jews living outside Israel, is slightly larger than the number of Jewish residents of Israel.) Among Jews who consider themselves religious, there is great diversity. The Orthodox believe that the Torah was handed down by God through Moses at Mount Sinai, so they live by

both the left and the right sides of the brain to become absorbed in the process. However, writing on a computer can encourage a writer to correct frequently (especially when reminded by spellcheckers) and can therefore inhibit the flow of words and sentences. If you are interested in using journal writing as a meditative technique, try both handwriting and computer writing to see which works for you. When writing, set a time limit of ten to twenty minutes. Writing in your meditative journal at

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