Mental Health in the Digital Age: Grave Dangers, Great Promise

Mental Health in the Digital Age: Grave Dangers, Great Promise

Language: English

Pages: 305

ISBN: 019938018X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Mental Health in the Digital Age: Grave Dangers, Great Promise

Language: English

Pages: 305

ISBN: 019938018X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Internet and related technologies have reconfigured every aspect of life, including mental health. Although the negative and positive effects of digital technology on mental health have been debated, all too often this has been done with much passion and few or no supporting data. In Mental Health in the Digital Age, Elias Aboujaoude and Vladan Starcevic have edited a book that brings together distinguished experts from around the world to review the evidence relating to this area.

The first part of the book addresses threats resulting from the growing reliance on, and misuse of, digital technology; it also looks at how some problematic behaviors and forms of psychopathology have been shaped by this technology. This section reviews problematic Internet and video game use, effects of violent video games on the levels of aggression and of online searches for health-related information on the levels of health anxiety, use of digital technology to harm other people, and promotion of suicide on the Internet.

The second part of Mental Health in the Digital Age examines the ways in which digital technology has boosted efforts to help people with mental health problems. These include the use of computers, the Internet, and mobile phones to educate and provide information necessary for psychiatric treatment and to produce programs for psychological therapy, as well as use of electronic mental health records to improve care.

Mental Health in the Digital Age is a unique and timely book because it examines comprehensively an intersection between digital technology and mental health and provides a state-of-the-art, evidence-based, and well-balanced look at the field. The book is a valuable resource and guide to an area often shrouded in controversy, as it is a work of critical thinking that separates the hype from the facts and offers data-driven conclusions. It is of interest particularly to mental health professionals, but also to general audience.

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need to include all types of online games in addiction models to make comparisons between genres and gamer populations possible, such as those who play online real-time strategy (RTS) games and online first-person shooter (FPS) games, in addition to the widely researched MMORPG players. FPS games portray three-dimensional environments that are viewed as if through the eyes of the character, with usually only the weapon being depicted. The majority of FPS games produced (eg, Return to Castle

games on aggressive affect, cognition, and behavior. Psychological Science 16: 882–889. Mental Health in the Digital Age  102 Carnagey NL, Anderson CA, Bushman BJ (2007). The effect of video game violence on physiological desensitization to real life violence. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 43: 489–496. Christakis DA, Zimmerman FJ, DiGiuseppe DL, McCarty CA (2004). Early television exposure and subsequent attentional problems in children. Pediatrics 113: 708–713. Collins AM, Loftus

Hazelden Publishing, Center City, MN. Mason KL (2008). Cyberbullying:  a preliminary assessment for school personnel. Psychology in the Schools 45: 323–348. Mitchell KJ, Ybarra M, Finkelhor D (2007). The relative importance of online victimization in understanding depression, delinquency, and substance use. Child Maltreatment 12: 314–324. Nansel TR, Overpeck M, Pilla RS, Ruan WJ, Simons-Morton B, Scheidt P (2001). Aggression behaviors among US youth: prevalence and association with psychosocial

aligned against prosuicide sites include more than politicians and mental health professionals. Technology blog and leading IT news source The Next Web listed suicide and self-harm communities as the second most disturbing type of online community, just after pro–anorexia nervosa and ahead of child pornography (Falconer, 2012). The article rightly mentions the provision of how-to methods of suicide as a particularly harmful feature. However, the claim that “hundreds of teen suicides have been

social factors affecting Internet searches on suicide in Korea: a big data analysis of Google search trends. Yonsei Medical Journal 55: 254–263. Sprecher S, Treger S, Wondra JD, Hilaire N, Wallpe K (2013). Taking turns: reciprocal self-disclosure promotes liking in initial interactions. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 49: 860–866. Stack S (2005). Suicide in the media: a quantitative review of studies based on nonfictional stories. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior 35: 121–133.

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