Mexican Everyday

Mexican Everyday

Rick Bayless, Deann Groen Bayless

Language: English

Pages: 336

ISBN: 039306154X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Mexican Everyday

Rick Bayless, Deann Groen Bayless

Language: English

Pages: 336

ISBN: 039306154X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


At last, a cookbook that brings Mexican food within easy reach: named to Food & Wine Magazine’s Year’s 25 Best Cookbooks as part of its annual Best of the Best cookbook.

In his previous books, Rick Bayless transformed America's understanding of Mexican cuisine, introducing authentic dishes and cooking methods as he walked readers through Mexican markets and street stalls. As much as Rick loves the bold flavors of Mexican foods, he understands that preparing many Mexican specialties requires more time than most of us have. Mexican Everyday is written with the time sensitivities of modern life in mind. It is a collection of 90 full-flavored recipes―like Green Chile Chicken Tacos, Shrimp Ceviche Salad, Chipotle Steak with Black Beans―that meet three criteria for "everyday" food: 1) most need less than 30 minutes' involvement; 2) they have the fresh, clean taste of simple, authentic preparations; and 3) they are nutritionally balanced, full-featured meals―no elaborate side dishes required. Companion to a thirteen-part public television series, this book provides dishes you can eat with family and friends, day in and day out.

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cloves, peeled 4 medium (about 8 ounces total) tomatillos, husked, rinsed and cut in half 2 canned chipotle chiles en adobo (or more, if you like really spicy salsa) Salt Set a large (10-inch) nonstick skillet over medium-high heat (if you don’t have a nonstick skillet, lay in a piece of foil). Lay in the garlic and tomatillos (cut side down). When the tomatillos are well browned, 3 or 4 minutes, turn everything over and brown the other side. (The tomatillos should be completely soft.) Scoop

potato wedges—lightly oiled and salted (even coated with a bit of the marinade), they will take 20 to 25 minutes to cook over medium to medium-high heat. Or replace the plantains with a scoop of Fried Beans (page 84). If time doesn’t allow for making your own salsa, buy a good bottled chipotle salsa. GRILLED CHICKEN BREASTS (OR THIGHS) WITH TANGY YUCATECAN SPICES, SEASONAL VEGETABLES AND ROASTED FRESH CHILE SALSA Grilled Chicken Breasts (or Thighs) with Tangy Yucatecan Spices, Seasonal

it from whole corn rather than reconstituting the powdered masa, which you could do yourself) If using powdered masa harina, measure it into a bowl and add 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons hot tap water. Knead with your hand until thoroughly combined. Cover and let it stand 15 minutes. Or, if using fresh masa, scoop it into a bowl. Break it up and knead it a few times until smooth. Set a large griddle (one that stretches over two burners) or two skillets on your stovetop. Heat one end of the griddle

and mushrooms and the typically Mexican-American melted cheese blanket has become the more typically Mexican light sprinkling of flavorful fresh cheese. Your only challenge will be temperature: In Mexico, most enchiladas are put together from warm ingredients and served right away—no baking. (But, then again, in Mexico, folks don’t like their food as hot as we do in the States.) My suggestions: When the tortillas come out of the oven, turn the oven off and slide your (ovenproof) dinner plates in

and fats for optimal muscle growth. I’d memorized their motto: you can’t grow muscle without good food. Strength training was for me. Not only did I feel and look great, but the muscle I was growing (and not losing) was asking me, encouraging me, requiring me to eat more. It was the perfect exercise for a food lover. And as strength training enthusiasts point out, muscle burns fuel all day long—as opposed to the more limited fuel-burning potential of aerobic activities like jogging. Through the

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