Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy

Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy

Sugata Bose

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 041577943X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy

Sugata Bose

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 041577943X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Drawing on the newest and most sophisticated historical research and scholarship in the field, Modern South Asia provides a challenging insight for those with an intellectual curiosity about the region. After sketching the pre-modern history of the subcontinent, the book concentrates on the last three centuries. Jointly authored by two leading Indian and Pakistani historians, it offers a rare depth of historical understanding of the politics, cultures, and economies that shape the lives of more than a fifth of humanity.

In this comprehensive study, the authors interpret and debate the striking developments in contemporary South Asian history and historical writing, covering the entire spectrum of the region’s modern history – social, economic and political. The book provides new insights into the structure and ideology of the British raj, the meaning of subaltern resistance, the refashioning of social relations along the lines of caste, class, community and gender, the different strands of anti-colonial nationalism and the dynamics of decolonization.

This third edition brings the debate up to the present day, taking account of recent historical research and covering the closer integration of South Asia with the global economy, the impact of developments in Afghanistan on the region as a whole, and the fresh challenges to South Asia’s nation-states.

From the Ruins of Empire: The Revolt Against the West and the Remaking of Asia

A Contest for Supremacy: China, America, and the Struggle for Mastery in Asia

Ancient Chinese Warfare

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

established herself as a scholar of Islamic mysticism, winning accolades from her Sufi mentor Molla Shah. The women of the Mughal household were of course hardly representative of the typical Indian woman, Hindu or Muslim. But there can be no denying their role in the making of the majesty that was the Mughal empire. Both the grandeur and the syncretism of the Mughal empire were reflected in the very considerable cultural achievements over which they presided. Persian was the court language of

revolt is that 1857 witnessed much more than simply a feudal reaction. The participation and initiative of the subordinate classes reveals a collage of multifaceted revolt. Leadership at the local levels was drawn not only from the ‘traditional elites’ but also from rather ordinary people from lower social classes and castes who came to the forefront during the throes of rebellion. Nawab Walidad Khan, a landed magnate, directed the agrarian revolt in Bulandshahr district until he vanished

had transformed one into the ‘majority’ 124 MODERN SOUTH ASIA and the other into the ‘minority’ community, it became easier for Hindu religious symbolisms and communitarian interests to be subsumed within the emerging discourse on the Indian nation. Even a Saiyid Ahmed Khan, his loyalism notwithstanding, was more opposed to majoritarianism of the Congress variety than the idea of an Indian nation. Others more inclined to making common cause with the Congress and seeking location within the

was sharply critical of Gandhi’s patronizing attitude towards the lower castes, resulted in the Poona Pact of 1932 by which, in return for a larger number of reserved seats, the lower castes gave up the idea of separate electorates. A new set of constitutional reforms was eventually passed collectively by the British parliament as the Government of India act of 1935. The act had two main parts — provincial and federal. At the provincial level dyarchy was abolished and all government departments

government of India would finance the war by making the mints work harder. The money supply in India rose from about Rs 3 billion in 1939 to Rs 22 billion in 1945. Since imports had dropped drastically due to the dislocations of war and government purchases of war-related material diverted some goods from Indian consumption, serious shortages developed and prices soared for essential commodities — for cloth, kerosene oil, and most important of all, food. The majority of India’s rural poor, as

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