More iPhone Development with Objective-C

More iPhone Development with Objective-C

Jeff LaMarche

Language: English

Pages: 512

ISBN: 1430260378

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

More iPhone Development with Objective-C

Jeff LaMarche

Language: English

Pages: 512

ISBN: 1430260378

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


If you are looking to extend your iOS programming skills beyond the basics then More iPhone Development with Objective-C is for you. Authors Dave Mark, Jayant Varma, Jeff LaMarche, Alex Horovitz, and Kevin Kim explain concepts as only they can—with code snippets you can customize and use, as you like, in your own apps.

More iPhone Development with Objective-C is an independent companion to Beginning iPhone Development with Objective-C. That is, it is a perfect second book, but it is also a great book for those looking to improve their skills who have already programmed for iOS. In particular it includes a series of chapters devoted to Core Data, the standard for Apple persistence. The authors carefully step through each Core Data concept and show techniques and tips specifically for writing larger apps—offering a breadth of coverage you won’t find anywhere else.

More iPhone Development with Objective-C covers a variety of other topics, including Multipeer Connectivity’s relatively simple Bluetooth/WiFi peer-to-peer model, MapKit, and media library access and playback so that your applications can utilize media on your users’ computer. You’ll also find coverage of Interface Builder, Live Previews and Custom Controls and some advanced techniques for debugging your applications. The book is filled with useful topics that will bring your programs up-to-date with the new functionality built into iOS.

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manually using Core Location in this application. By doing it manually, we can show you more Map Kit features. If you need to track the user’s location in your own applications, just let the map view do it for you. That’s it. You declared the outlets and action you need via Interface Builder. Save ViewController.h. Before you work on the implementation file, you need to work on your annotation class. Writing the Annotation Object Class You need to create a class to hold your annotation object.

the map type, add more annotations, or try experimenting with custom annotation views. Go East, Young Programmer That brings us to the end of the discussion of Map Kit. You saw the basics of how to use Map Kit, annotations, and the reverse geocoder. You saw how to create coordinate regions and coordinate spans to specify what area the map view should show to the user, and you learned how to use Map Kit’s reverse geocoder to turn a set of coordinates into a physical address. Now, armed with

yourself so worked up that you miss an obvious solution. And then there are times when even a change of scenery doesn’t help. In those situations, it’s good to have friends in high places. Here are some resources you can turn to when you’re in a bind. Apple’s Documentation Become one with Xcode’s documentation browser. The documentation browser is a front end to a wealth of incredibly valuable sample source code, concept guides, API references, video tutorials, and a whole lot more. There are

over the Unknown Hero of the Identity row. You should see the keyboard input view appear on the bottom of the screen, and a cursor should appear at the end of Unknown Hero. Tap another row. The cursor should appear in that row. Let’s edit the Identity row. Tap over the Unknown Hero to activate the keyboard input view. Tap the x button at the right end of the cell. This should erase Unknown Hero. Now type Super Cat and tap Save. You should exit editing mode, and your hero’s new identity should

@end in ViewController.h. Create a new action named gameButtonPressed (Figure 9-15). Figure 9-15.Creating the gameButtonPressed action Now you need to connect an action to the nine game space buttons. You don’t need to define outlets for them, though, just the actions. Control-drag from the upper-left button to the just below the action, gameButtonPressed, you just created. Create a new action named gameSpacePressed. Now, Control-drag from every other game space button to the gameSpacePressed

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