More Lost Massey Lectures: Recovered Classics from Five Great Thinkers

More Lost Massey Lectures: Recovered Classics from Five Great Thinkers

Claude Lévi-Strauss, Barbara Ward, Frank H. Underhill, George Grant, Willy Brandt

Language: English

Pages: 270

ISBN: 2:00077465

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

More Lost Massey Lectures: Recovered Classics from Five Great Thinkers

Claude Lévi-Strauss, Barbara Ward, Frank H. Underhill, George Grant, Willy Brandt

Language: English

Pages: 270

ISBN: 2:00077465

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


A broadcasting fixture for more than 45 years and Canada’s preeminent public lecture series, the CBC's Massey Lectures feature provocative talks on pressing topics by major contemporary thinkers. Some of the series’ finest lectures have been lost for many years, unavailable to the public in any form — until now. More Lost Massey Lectures presents recently rediscovered talks: Nobel Prize-winner Willy Brandt discusses the dangerous inequities between developing and industrialized nations while Barbara Ward explains the origin and predicament of underdeveloped countries and Frank Underhill speaks on the deficiencies of the Canadian constitution. George Grant's talk on the worsening predicament of the West through an examination of Friedrich Nietzsche is joined by Claude Levi-Strauss on the nature of myth and its role in human history. Not only of considerable historical significance, these lectures remain hugely relevant in the 21st century. Also included is an introduction by veteran CBC producer Bernie Lucht.

L'Énéide

The Iliad

Who Fears Death

Thorn Jack (Night and Nothing, Book 1)

Playing Hesiod: The 'Myth of the Races' in Classical Antiquity (Cambridge Classical Studies)

The Mabinogion Tetralogy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

may in the end reach a better understanding of what historical science really is. I am not far from believing that, in our own societies, history has replaced mythology and fulfils the same function, that for societies without writing and without archives the aim of mythology is to ensure that as closely as possible — complete closeness is obviously impossible — the future will remain faithful to the present and to the past. For us, however, the future should be always different, and ever more

and to call one “sonata,” another “rondo,” and so on. I then came upon a myth, the structure of which I could very well understand, but I was unable to find a musical form which would correspond to this mythical structure. So I called my friend the composer, René Leibowitz, and explained to him my problem. I told him the structure of the myth: at the beginning two entirely different stories, apparently without any relationship with each other, progressively become intertwined and merge, until at

scale of aid must be adequate. Patchy development, a little here, a little there, does not lead to sustained growth. In every developing economy, there comes a time when, for perhaps two decades, a “big push” is needed to get the economy off the launching-pad and into orbit. Not all nations come to that point at the same time. There seems to be a certain pattern of progress and expansion, and different economies are ranged at different points along the line. First there is a phase that one might

were simply a kind of thinking; others as if it were desiring. Neither seems to me satisfactory. Therefore, to approach the language of “willing” it is useful to relate it to our “desiring” and “thinking” and then to distinguish it therefrom. What we are determined to do is clearly related to our thought about purposes and our calculating about the means to those purposes. But however long and beautifully men deliberate about purposes, however carefully they calculate, there comes the moment

optimism of rational man was sustained for us in the expectations of the pioneering moment. It was also sustained by the fact that among most of our population our identification of virtue and happiness took the earlier and more virile form which came out of Biblical religion, rather than the soft definition of that identification in the liberalisms of the last men. Among the early majority this was above all Protestant; but its virility was sustained in the Catholicism and Judaism of the later

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