National Geographic Angry Birds Furious Forces: The Physics at Play in the World's Most Popular Game

National Geographic Angry Birds Furious Forces: The Physics at Play in the World's Most Popular Game

Rhett Allain

Language: English

Pages: 160

ISBN: 1426211724

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

National Geographic Angry Birds Furious Forces: The Physics at Play in the World's Most Popular Game

Rhett Allain

Language: English

Pages: 160

ISBN: 1426211724

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Another Angry Birds National Geographic mash-up! This fun, engaging paperback uses Angry Birds to explain the physics at work in the world--and behind the popular game.

National Geographic's trademark science blends with Angry Birds' beloved entertainment to take readers into the world of physics. Rhett Allain, physics professor and Wired blogger explains basic scientific principles in fun, accessible ways; the Angry Birds come along for the ride to illustrate concepts we see in the real world--as well as in the Angry Birds games. Packed with science and a sense of humor, this book will improve readers' understanding of the world and how it works--and it may just improve their Angry Birds scores as well.

Rovio Learning is known for collaborating with several scientific and educational institutions, such as the National Geographic Society and NASA. The recent collaboration with CERN brings quantum physics to the reach of children. There is no subject that young children can not learn - when the medium is age-appropriate, fun and engaging!

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between the angles of incidence and refraction when a light wave passes through a boundary between two different media, like water and glass. White light passing through a prism breaks into many different colors. 64 What happens when white light passes through glass? It bends. We call this refraction. And as it happens, different colors of light bend differ- ent amounts. If you have a piece of glass shaped correctly, you can get white light to separate into all the colors of the rainbow.

no longer pushing on the ball, because you’re not touching it. If there aren’t any other forces on the ball—such as a bat hitting the ball—the ball shouldn’t change its velocity. Actually, there are other forces, like gravity and air resistance, interacting with the ball, but over the short time from the pitcher’s mound to home plate, these forces don’t have much impact on the velocity. Forces can make an object speed up or slow down. When the ball interacts with the catcher’s glove, the catcher

objects, gravity will cause them to fall, like this glass of milk. 23 Gravity is the one force that we all experience. The gravitational force is an interaction between all objects with mass. However, for most objects, this interaction is much too small to notice. On Earth, when we talk about gravity, we are probably talking about the gravitational pull of the Earth. WHY DOES A BALL SLOW DOWN AFTER YOU THROW IT IN THE AIR? What happens if you take a cup and let go? Once you let go, there is

pulls down, it changes the velocity only in the vertical direction. The horizontal velocity doesn’t change. HOW DO YOU SHOOT AN ARROW FARTHER? An arrow shot horizontally won’t go as far as an arrow shot at a slight upward angle. Why? The inclined arrow has some initial velocity in the vertical direction. This means that it will take longer for the arrow to start moving down toward the ground. The longer time gives the arrow more time to travel horizontally. If you aim too high, you decrease the

forth. When you do this, you push the air (unless you are an astro- naut in space or a mermaid). Even though air is thin, it runs into some more air, and in turn pushes it forward. The result is a compression wave of air molecules. Now suppose you could move your hand back and forth 200 times every second. If you could do this, the compression air waves you would be creating would be heard by other people’s ears. Well, you can’t do it with your hand, but you can do it with your vocal cords or a

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