Necessary Lies

Necessary Lies

Diane Chamberlain

Language: English

Pages: 372

ISBN: 1250054516

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Necessary Lies

Diane Chamberlain

Language: English

Pages: 372

ISBN: 1250054516

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


It is 1960 in North Carolina and the lives of Ivy Hart and Jane Forrester couldn't be more different. Fifteen-year-old Ivy lives with her family as tenants on a small tobacco farm, but when her parents die, Ivy is left to care for her grandmother, older sister, and nephew. As she struggles with her grandmother's aging, her sister's mental illness, and her own epilepsy, she realizes they might need more than she can give.
When Jane Forrester takes a position as Grace County's newest social worker, she is given the task of recommending which of her clients should be sterilized without their knowledge or consent. The state's rationalization is that if her clients are poor, or ill, or deemed in some way "unfit" they should not be allowed to have children. But soon Jane becomes emotionally invested in her clients' lives, causing tension with her new husband and her supervisors. No one understands why Jane would want to become a caseworker for the Department of Public Health when she could be a housewife and Junior League member. As Jane is drawn in by the Hart women, she begins to discover the secrets of the small farm―secrets much darker than she would have guessed. Soon, she must decide whether to take drastic action to help them, or risk losing a life-changing battle.

Necessary Lies is the story of these two young women, seemingly worlds apart, but both haunted by tragedy. Jane and Ivy are thrown together and must ask themselves: How can you know what you believe is right, when everyone is telling you it's wrong?

Sunnyside

Heartbreaker

The Pugilist at Rest

Young Turk

The Noise of Time

A Week in December

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“You did what you had to do,” Ivy said firmly. She touched my knee. “Jane, I never blamed you for anything. Maybe a little back then, but the more I grew up, the more I could see why you had to do it. It turns out William got adopted out of the residential school he was in.” “Adopted!” “They couldn’t tell me who adopted him. It’s not like today, when all that’s so open and everything, so we never were able to track him down.” “That’s a goal of mine,” Rose said. “He’s my cousin. Maybe he’d like

“You did what you had to do,” Ivy said firmly. She touched my knee. “Jane, I never blamed you for anything. Maybe a little back then, but the more I grew up, the more I could see why you had to do it. It turns out William got adopted out of the residential school he was in.” “Adopted!” “They couldn’t tell me who adopted him. It’s not like today, when all that’s so open and everything, so we never were able to track him down.” “That’s a goal of mine,” Rose said. “He’s my cousin. Maybe he’d like

the Monday after our return from Hawaii, and Robert wasn’t happy about it. He raised his hand to stop anything else I might say. “We’ve settled it about your job,” he said. “You can try it for a while. I told you that, so you don’t need to bring it up over and over again.” “I’ll make our meals on Sundays and we can heat them up in the oven each night.” We’d have a maid, of course, but cooking wasn’t supposed to be one of her tasks. “I’ll be sure to get home in time to do that.” All his Raleigh

head against the cool tile wall. I thought of the houses I went into, some of them more like shacks. Some of them filthy and crawling with vermin. I’d brought them home, almost certainly. He was right about that. I pulled myself together and got weakly to my feet. He’d be angry if I didn’t have the bed stripped and the laundry going by the time he got home. I could hardly blame him. 35 Ivy “Set aside some of these for supper tonight,” Nonnie said, as me and her shelled peas at the

Someday, I thought, I might have an office like this. “So.” She settled behind her desk and smiled at me and I liked her instantly. Such warmth and confidence in that smile! She looked nothing like I’d imagined a social worker to look. She was striking. She had to be in her forties—maybe even her fifties—but, except for a starburst of faint lines at the outer corners of her eyes, her skin looked as if it belonged in an Ivory soap commercial. Her gray eyes were huge and her hair, which was a

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