Norwegian Folktales (The Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library)

Norwegian Folktales (The Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library)

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: 0394710541

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Norwegian Folktales (The Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library)

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: 0394710541

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Long a treasure in Norway, the folktales collected by Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe have been acclaimed for their richness of humor, fullness of life, and depth of understanding since they first appeared in translation more than a hundred years ago. The Norwegian folktales, said Jacob Grimm, “surpass nearly all others.”
 
Within these captivating tales we meet witches, trolls, and ogres; sly foxes and great, mysterious bears; beautiful princesses and country-lads-turned-heroes. Collected here in a sparkling contemporary translation by Pat Shaw Iversen and Carl Norman, these tales brim with the matchless vitality and power of their original telling. Included also are the wonderfully evocative original illustrations of Erik Werenskiold and Theodor Kittelsen.

With black-and-white drawings throughout
Part of the Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library 

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The Adventures of Sindbad (New York Review Books Classics)

The Poison Eaters: and Other Stories

History of Religious Ideas, Volume 3: From Muhammad to the Age of Reforms

Implicit Meanings: Selected Essays in Anthropology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

king’s daughter ride to her lover tonight?” The ram bleated and said it dared not say, but when it was struck one more blow, it said that the king’s daughter would come at eleven o’clock. The Companion put on the three-sister-hat, which made him invisible, and waited until she came. She smeared the ram with a salve which she had in a great horn, and then she said, “Aloft! Aloft! Over rooftree and church spire, over land, over water, over hill, over dale, to my lover who waits for me in the

visit. She scurried through forest and deep valleys, and even though the Country Mouse had moved down the mountain for the winter, the way was both long and hard. It was uphill, and the snow was deep and loose, so that she grew both tired and hungry before she got there. “Now it will be good to have some food,” she thought when she arrived. The Country Mouse had scraped together pretty well: there were nut kernels, and many different kinds of roots, and all sorts of good things which grow in

in an old carcass,” he said. “Why yes, so I can,” said the boy. “But what sort of a fellow are you, and where do you come from?” he asked. “Me? I’m known well enough. I’m the Devil and I come from below, I do,” said the man. “Nay,” said the boy, “you only plague and torment folk, and wherever there’s any misery afoot, they always say it’s your fault. Nay, I won’t drink with you!” said the boy. So he walked far, and farther than far again, until his beer keg had grown so heavy that he could

soon as this was done, he gave her the healing drink, so she was saved. “Now you’ve cheated me!” said Death. “And now we’re quits!” “I had to if I was to win land and kingdom,” said the boy. “That won’t help you much,” said Death. “Your time is up, for now you belong to me.” “Well, if it has to be, then so let it be,” said the boy. “But surely you’ll let me say the Lord’s Prayer first,” he said. Yes, that he could do, but he took good care not to say the Lord’s Prayer. He said everything

saddle and bridle and all, and then he hurried on his way. They journeyed through forest and field, over mountain and broad moors. When they had travelled farther than far, the donkey asked if the boy could see anything. “No, I see nothing but a high mountain which looks purple in the distance.” “Well, we’re going through that mountain,” said the donkey. “Am I to believe that?” said the boy. When they came to the mountain, a unicorn came charging towards them as though it wanted to eat them

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