Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (4th Edition)

Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (4th Edition)

Language: English

Pages: 1040

ISBN: 0672323087

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (4th Edition)

Language: English

Pages: 1040

ISBN: 0672323087

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Object-Oriented Programming in C++ begins with the basic principles of the C++ programming language and systematically introduces increasingly advanced topics while illustrating the OOP methodology. While the structure of this book is similar to that of the previous edition, each chapter reflects the latest ANSI C++ standard and the examples have been thoroughly revised to reflect current practices and standards.

 

Educational Supplement

Suggested solutions to the programming projects found at the end of each chapter are made available to instructors at recognized educational institutions. This educational supplement can be found at www.prenhall.com, in the Instructor Resource Center.

Hacking: The Art of Exploitation (2nd Edition)

Erlang and OTP in Action

Foundation ActionScript 3.0 Animation: Making Things Move!

C Programming for Arduino

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

function have local scope; that is, they are visible only within the function body. Similarly, class members are only visible within the class (unless the scope resolution operator is used). Program elements declared outside any function or class have global scope: they can be used throughout an entire file, following the point where they are defined. As we’ll see, they are visible in other files as well. Inter-File Variables We’ll start with simple variables. Recall the distinction between

implements stack class as a template #include using namespace std; const int MAX = 100;            //size of array //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// template class Stack { private: Type st[MAX];             //stack: array of any type int top;                  //number of top of stack public: Stack()                   //constructor { top = -1; } void push(Type var)       //put number on stack { st[++top] = var; } Type

avg = getavg(data); cout << "New average is " << avg << endl; } return 0; } //-------------------------------------------------------------- // getavg() // finds average of old plus new data float getavg(float newdata) { static float total = 0;  //static variables are initialized static int count = 0;    //   only once per program count++;                 //increment count total += newdata;        //add new data to total return total / count;    //return the new average } Here’s some sample

increasingly applied to analyzing a programming problem and figuring out what classes and objects should be used to represent the real-world situation (which is often called the problem domain). We’ll discuss this methodology in detail in Chapter 16, “Object-Oriented Software Development.” Some of the benefits of object-oriented programming are probably not apparent at this point. Remember that OOP was devised to cope with the complexity of large programs. Smaller programs, such as the examples

(sales in this case) actually represents the memory address of the array. We aren’t going to explore addresses in detail until Chapter 10, “Pointers,” but here are a few preliminary points about them. Using an address for an array argument is similar to using a reference argument, in that the values of the array elements are not duplicated (copied) into the function. (See the discussion of reference arguments in Chapter 5, “Functions.”) Instead, the function works with the original array,

Download sample

Download