On the Front Line: The Collected Journalism of Marie Colvin

On the Front Line: The Collected Journalism of Marie Colvin

Marie Colvin

Language: English

Pages: 560

ISBN: 0007487967

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

On the Front Line: The Collected Journalism of Marie Colvin

Marie Colvin

Language: English

Pages: 560

ISBN: 0007487967

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Veteran Sunday Times war correspondent, Marie Colvin was killed in February 2012 when covering the uprising in Syria. Winner of the Orwell Special Prize ‘On the Front Line’ is a collection of her finest work, a portion of the proceeds from which will go to the Marie Colvin Memorial Fund…

Marie Colvin held a profound belief in the pursuit of truth, and the courage and humanity of her work was deeply admired. On the Front Line includes her various interviews with Yasser Arafat and Colonel Gadaffi; reports from East Timor in 1999 where she shamed the UN into protecting its refugees; accounts of her terrifying escape from the Russian army in Chechnya; and reports from the strongholds of the Sri Lankan Tamil Tigers where she was hit by shrapnel, leaving her blind in one eye.

Typically, however, her new eye-patch only reinforced Colvin’s sense of humour and selfless conviction. She returned quickly to the front line, reporting on 9/11, Afghanistan, Iraq, Gaza and, lately, the Arab Spring.

Immediate and compelling, On the Front Line is a street-view of the historic events that have shaped the last 25 years, from an award-winning foreign correspondent and the outstanding journalist of her generation.

Bobbed Hair and Bathtub Gin: Writers Running Wild in the Twenties

A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton

AC/DC: High-Voltage Rock 'n' Roll: The Ultimate Illustrated History

Soul of the Age: A Biography of the Mind of William Shakespeare

Paradise General: Riding the Surge at a Combat Hospital in Iraq

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Israel,’ he says. ‘All the land is ours. We are taught this by our leaders and they will never compromise.’ His certitude comes from how Hamas recruits. It gets them young; my informant started at 14. Only when he proved himself ‘mentally and spiritually’ was he allowed to join Qassam and receive military training. And not all girls are like Azil Akhras. Gehad Nehan, 19, is studying law at the Hamas-dominated Islamic University in Gaza. She wears glasses, a hijab, and is covered in a navy-blue

[martyr]. He achieved both his targets.’ America denied having any connection with the assassinations last week. ‘We were not involved in any way with regards to the assassination that took place there,’ said Leon Panetta, the defence secretary. But he did say enigmatically that he had ‘some idea’ of who was. The Foreign Office also said Britain had ‘no involvement whatsoever’ in the deaths of the scientists. Most experts in the field have few doubts: the assassinations have all the hallmarks

regime appeared to be arming the minority Alawite community, to which the Assad family belongs. There are growing fears of a civil war, with the FSA not only controlling parts of Homs, but also fighting in Damascus, the capital. An FSA spokesman said it had lost 27 soldiers in the past four days and claimed the death toll from the shelling in Homs exceeded 350. ‘We capture soldiers to show how weak the regime is,’ said Abu Ali, an FSA commander. ‘Their soldiers fight for one person: Bashar.’

I never got to meet him. Miyir, 4, died of hunger on Friday morning as I drove into his camp. Hours later, his father was still waving flies away from his tiny body, which was wrapped in his mother’s headscarf. It looked far too festive for such a tragic thing as the death of a child. There was little joy in Miyir’s last days. His family’s livestock began dying as the drought in Ethiopia moved into its third year. For months Miyir’s parents, Hassan and Safia, and their five children drove

the prisoners, Colin Powell, the secretary of state, has urged the president to reconsider the classification of the captives. The request, revealed in a memo from White House counsel Alberto Gonzales to the president and forwarded to the most senior figures of his war cabinet, outlines the legal issues involved, reminding the president of Powell’s original request. ‘Specifically he has asked that you conclude that GPW [Geneva Convention II on the treatment of prisoners of war] does apply to

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