Outlaw Journalist: The Life and Times of Hunter S. Thompson

Outlaw Journalist: The Life and Times of Hunter S. Thompson

William McKeen

Language: English

Pages: 464

ISBN: 0393335453

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Outlaw Journalist: The Life and Times of Hunter S. Thompson

William McKeen

Language: English

Pages: 464

ISBN: 0393335453

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


“Gets it all in: the boozing and drugging . . . but also the intelligence, the loyalty, the inherent decency.” ―Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post

Hunter S. Thompson detonated a two-ton bomb under the staid field of journalism with his magazine pieces and revelatory Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. In Outlaw Journalist, the famous inventor of Gonzo journalism is portrayed as never before. Through in-depth interviews with Thompson’s associates, William McKeen gets behind the drinking and the drugs to show the man and the writer―one who was happy to be considered an outlaw and for whom the calling of journalism was life.16 pages of photographs

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and network-news broadcasts just as the FBI finally tracked down Hearst and captured her, along with Bill and Emily Harris. It was a masterpiece of journalistic timing and the sort of coup that had been the province of the New York Times, when it broke the Pentagon Papers stories, or of the Washington Post, when Judge Sirica’s letter vindicated its Watergate reporting. It was the greatest story in Rolling Stone’s history, and it wasn’t by Hunter Thompson. It wasn’t his kind of story, anyway. He

astounded as everyone else to realize I’m still alive.” As his old friend Porter Bibb said, “He not only created Gonzo writing; he created Gonzo living.” The still-young vigorous Hunter at the end of the seventies gave way to the world-weary, sunken-eyed, and puffier Hunter of the eighties. “I saw myself in the mirror as a grizzled veteran of many wars,” he wrote. He fancied himself an athlete. He still felt young; he’d played football with Sebastian Corcoran in Key West and run his boat

came and went. The assistants were always young and beautiful, and Hunter expected that they would eventually become girlfriends. If it didn’t happen, he’d shrug and go on. Deborah ran his life: paid the bills, kept Hunter on point, bought the groceries, made phone calls, cooked the dinner, kept the assistants fed and housed. He never stopped writing. A typical evening might start around nine o’clock, but he wouldn’t actually start writing until four or five in the morning. He filled the time

Journalism (New York: Harper and Row, 1973), p. 15. 149 “I don’t know what the fuck”: Carroll, Hunter, p. 124. CHAPTER 10: FREAK POWER 150 “The article is useless”: Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in America (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2000), p. 309. 151 “I thought, ‘holy shit’”: Craig Vetter, “The Playboy Interview with Hunter S. Thompson,” Playboy, November 1974. 151 “Unlike Tom Wolfe or Gay Talese”: Ibid. 152 “and shit on everything”: Thompson, Fear and Loathing in America, p.

impression on Wenner by being late. The editor fumed in his oversized straw chair behind his huge round desk. “This better be good,” he spat at Lombardi, as he awaited Hunter’s arrival. Then Hunter appeared in the doorway, wearing an aloha shirt, a frosted-blond woman’s wig, and clenching in his teeth a cigarette holder, looking like a demented Franklin Roosevelt. He carried a satchel, with hats, wigs, police sirens, knives, flares, and some manuscripts, and he juggled on his knees two six packs

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