Parzival and Titurel (Oxford World's Classics)

Parzival and Titurel (Oxford World's Classics)

Language: English

Pages: 464

ISBN: 0199539200

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Parzival and Titurel (Oxford World's Classics)

Language: English

Pages: 464

ISBN: 0199539200

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Written in the first decade of the thirteenth century, Parzival is the greatest of the medieval Grail romances. It tells of Parzival's growth from youthful folly to knighthood at the court of King Arthur, and of his quest for the Holy Grail. Exuberant and gothic in its telling, and profoundly moving, Parzival has inspired and influenced works as diverse as Wagner's Parsifal and Lohengrin, Terry Gilliam's film The Fisher King, and Umberto Eco's Bandolino.
This fine translation, the first English version for over 25 years, conveys the power of this complex, wide-ranging medieval masterpiece. The introduction places Eschenbach's work in the wider context of the development of the Arthurian romance and of the Grail legend. This edition also includes an index to proper names and a genealogical table, and is the first to combine Parzival with the fragments of Titurel.

About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

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borne towards the gate. Women and men alike declared there that never had they seen such a splendid warrior––their gods, so they thought, resembled him. Sturdy spears were also carried alongside him. How is he accoutred? His charger wore a covering of iron––that was its comfort against blows. On top of this lay a second cover, light, of no great weight––it was of green samite. His tabard and his surcoat were also green, of achmardi. They had been wrought over in Araby. I am not lying to anyone in

against fame, his father, was better clad upon the carpet before Kanvoleiz––he never exuded fearful sweat. A knight came riding towards him. Parzival greeted him in his customary way: ‘God keep you, so my mother advised me!’ ‘Young lord, God reward you and her!’ said Arthur’s aunt’s son. He had been brought up by Uther Pendragon. This same warrior also laid hereditary claim to the land of Britain. He was Ither of Gaheviez. The Red Knight they called him. His equipment was all so red that it

charge laid to and took the tables away again. Four trolleys were then loaded. Each and every lady did her duty, first those that had arrived last, then the first. Then they led the most noble amongst them back      Parzival to the Grail. To the host and to Parzival the queen bowed courteously, as did all the little damsels. They took back through the door what they had decorously carried out before. Parzival gazed after them. Lying on a camp-bed, he saw, in a chamber, before

that was well shod, and an unshod horse obliged to carry a lady, whom he espied. It befell him to ride after her. Her horse was forfeit to misery. You could easily have counted every single one of its ribs through its hide. It was the colour of an ermine. A halter of bast lay upon it. Its mane hung down as low as its hoof, its eyes deep, the sockets wide. Moreover, this lady’s nag was neglected and jaded, often woken by hunger. It was dry as tinder. That it could even walk was a wonder, for it

their courtesy commanded. Gawan headed away towards his own pavilion. Lady Cunneware de Lalant’s tent-ropes ran right next to his. She was delighted; with joy the maiden welcomed her knight, who had avenged what she had suffered before at Kay’s hands. She took her brother by the hand, and Lady Jeschute of Karnant. Parzival saw them all coming towards him. Through the iron’s marks his face shone as though dewy roses had flown there. His armour had been drawn off him. He leapt to his feet when he saw

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