Passionate Friendship: The Aesthetics of Girls' Culture in Japan

Passionate Friendship: The Aesthetics of Girls' Culture in Japan

Deborah Michelle Shamoon

Language: English

Pages: 196

ISBN: B01F9G7UP2

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Passionate Friendship: The Aesthetics of Girls' Culture in Japan

Deborah Michelle Shamoon

Language: English

Pages: 196

ISBN: B01F9G7UP2

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This book traces the development of girls print culture in twentieth-century Japan by examining the narrative and visual aesthetics of prewar girls magazines. It explores the ways in which that prewar culture influenced the development of postwar girls comics.

Sherlock Holmes and Philosophy: The Footprints of a Gigantic Mind (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Bitch, Issue 61: Food (Winter 2014)

Divas, Dames & Daredevils: Lost Heroines of Golden Age Comics

The Amazing Transforming Superhero!: Essays on the Revision of Characters in Comic Books, Film and Television

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meiji woman, educated and modest, and she is rewarded with marriage to Tsutomu. Though they both seem to adhere to ren’ai, their courtship is strangely abbreviated. Rebecca Copeland suggests this elision is because their union was a foregone conclusion, obviating the need for The Emergence of the Shōjo 23 an extended courtship in the narrative (Lost Leaves 81). However, it also seems to reflect some ambivalence about ren’ai on Kaho’s part. The scene in which Hideko and Tsutomu finally meet

tempestuous emotional display of Ukigumo, this couple is not terribly convincing. If theirs is meant to be the ideal marriage, why is their courtship so abbreviated in the narrative? This ellipsis seems to indicate some hesitation about the ideals of female behavior. Even more disruptive than the elision of Hideko and Tsutomu’s courtship is the insertion of Namiko in one chapter that allows Kaho to air her views on women’s education. The girl student does not merely study for her own sake or even

(ibid. 72–81). Yonezawa Yoshihiro also credits Takahashi Makoto with innovating this incorporation of the style picture into the narrative (51). Why was this innovation of the full-body portrait so important for the development of visual narrative in shōjo manga? The use of style pictures and full-body portraits is one point on which critics have disparaged shōjo manga, by The Formation of Postwar Shōjo Manga 97 Figure 4.5. Mari reveals to Mayumi that she first met Mayumi’s father at Mirror

no bara [Shūeisha Bunkō, 2004], 1:143. © Ikeda Riyoko Production) The Revolution in 1970s Shōjo Manga 127 Matsui suggests, reader identification in shōjo manga does not necessarily follow gender lines; however, it is interesting that readers rejected Rosalie, the image of female suffering, as a point of identification, in favor of André. Although Oscar and André’s relationship is in a biological sense heterosexual, it is still configured within the story as homogender. As a masculine woman

canonical, genre-defining novels shows the extent to which the shōjo is one of the key sites in which issues of both gender identity and national identity have been contested in twentieth-century Japan. This patriarchal image of the girl as disruptive to the family and the nation is still reproduced today. However, it is important to distinguish between these mainstream, male authored texts aimed at a male audience and the image of the girl that arose within girls’ culture, which Miyako Inoue

Download sample

Download