Pictorial Webster's Pocket Dictionary

Pictorial Webster's Pocket Dictionary

Language: English

Pages: 208

ISBN: 1452101647

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Pictorial Webster's Pocket Dictionary

Language: English

Pages: 208

ISBN: 1452101647

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Since its publication in 2009, Pictorial Webster's has captivated legions of readers with its vintage charm. Now a selection of over 200 gorgeous engravings that once graced the pages of 19th-century Webster's dictionaries are gathered in this tiny treasure trove of visual wonders. This compact, portable reference is perfect for stuffing in the stockings of scholars, designers, and anyone with a taste for the antique. Ranging from the mysterious to the iconic, the visual curiosities in this pocket-sized volume offer a wellspring of creative inspiration. With a tactile package that reproduces the old-world allure of the original, Pictorial Webster's Pocket Dictionary is a little gem of a book.

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scientific and clinical feel to them. The old horror of cutting across the line is gone, as the emphasis of the New School was not line but tone. After Webster’s New International Dictionary was published in 1909, the engraving process was abandoned. Images that were new to the 1934 Webster’s New International Dictionary, Second Edition and the 1961 Webster’s Third New International Dictionary were printed from mounted copper plates made from line drawings. These later cuts make an interesting

Oberlin College Mail Room box number was 397 and I can still smell the sycamore leaves that fell on the ramp to the mail room when I see that number in print. The images in each letter chapter of the Pocket Pictorial are organized by sequence, are part of a single long number, or are a collection of numbers belonging together for a reason that one might recognize. I have provided hints in the headings to help the reader guess what the numbers may reference. In a couple of instances I have used a

sister, my friends, and strangers such as “Hank Dee” and the man I met at the Codex Symposium who told me he picks up Pictorial Webster’s every day to find a little inspiration. Special thanks also to my “John” friends: Jon Ustun, Jon Calame, John Chamberlain, John Mason, and John Fisher for being there. I am indebted to John Andrew and William Fowler Hopson and the editors of the G. & C. Merriam Company who were responsible for the creation of the images in this book. This has really been a

Good design is elemental.” Although fewer in number than in Pictorial Webster’s, the engravings in this work are reproduced from the nineteenth-century engravings used in Webster’s Dictionaries printed by the G. & C. Merriam Co. (George and Charles Merriam bought the rights to the official “Webster’s” in 1847, four years after Noah Webster died.) These engravings were borrowed from the 10,000 plus engravings and their exact metal duplicates called electrotypes held by the Arts of the Book

Collection at Yale University. Wood engravings are created through a reduction process on the end-grain of boxwood using sharp little tools called burins. Boxwood is soft, but has incredibly dense grain, which allows for great detail. To print the engravings, ink is rolled onto the carved block then that block is pressed into the paper. The images in the book span two distinctive eras in American wood engraving. Black Line engravings, also called American Style, are made by making or transferring

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