Pigment Compendium Set: Pigment Compendium: A Dictionary of Historical Pigments

Pigment Compendium Set: Pigment Compendium: A Dictionary of Historical Pigments

Nicholas Eastaugh, Valentine Walsh, Tracey Chaplin, Ruth Siddall

Language: English

Pages: 512

ISBN: 0750657499

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Pigment Compendium Set: Pigment Compendium: A Dictionary of Historical Pigments

Nicholas Eastaugh, Valentine Walsh, Tracey Chaplin, Ruth Siddall

Language: English

Pages: 512

ISBN: 0750657499

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Pigment Compendium Dictionary is a comprehensive information source for scientists, art historians, conservators and forensic specialists.

Drawn together from extensive analystical research into the physical and chemical properties of pigments, this essential reference to pigment names and synonyms describes the inter-relationship of different names and terms.

The Dictionary covers the field worldwide from pre-history to the present day, from rock art to interior decoration, from ethnography to contemporary art. Drawing on hundreds of hard-to-obtain documentary sources as well as modern scientific data each term is discussed in detail, giving both its context and composition.

* Comprehensive list of pigment names and synonyms
* Pigments used worldwide from pre-history to the present day
* Contains information from hundreds of hard-to-obtain documentary sources

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naturally in soils in poorly crystallised (disordered) form, but is more common as a synthetic phase, belonging to the hexagonal system (Cornell and Schwertmann, 1996). Natural feroxyhytes occur above weathered basalts and have so far only been identified on Hawaii (Parfitt et al., 1988). Synthetic feroxyhyte may be produced by titrating iron(II) chloride with sodium hydroxide and water (Schwertmann and Cornell, 2000). Identifications in works of art are not yet known. Iron oxides and hydroxides

which are derived from the high pressure, low temperature metamorphism of basaltic rocks and sedimentary rocks (blueschists), and may be derived from the alteration of jadeite (q.v.). It is frequently found in association with riebeckite and crossite (q.v.) which have similar chemistries but are richer in iron. These rocks are abundant in coastal California, Siphnos and Syros (Greece), Italy and Japan, but are otherwise rare. The name glaucophane is derived from the Greek words glaukos, meaning

of artificial azurite (Richter, 1988). Additional identifications are given by Naumova and Pisareva (1994). Copper group; Copper halides group; Azurite; Botallackite; Clinoatacamite; Copper chloride hydroxide, atacamite type; Paratacamite; Viride salsum Banik et al. (1982); Delbourgo (1980); El Goresy et al. (1986); Green (2001); Kerber et al. (1972); Naumova & Pisareva (1994); Richter (1988); Van’T Hul-Ehrnreich & Hallebeek (1972); Wainwright et al. (1993) ATRAMENTUM Black Synonym, variant or

phosphates group; Carbon-based blacks group: Cokes sub-group; Bone, calcined; Carbonate-hydroxylapatite Ascenzi et al. (1985); Camacho et al. (1999); Cattaneo et al. (1992); Collins et al. (2002); Deer et al. (1992) 669; Kakoulli (2003); Lowenstam & Weiner (1989); Mehmel (1930); Person et al. (1996); Price (1983); Reiche et al. (2002); Rutley (1988) 338; Weiner & Traub (1992); Weser et al. (1996); Wess et al. (2001) BONE ASH White Synonym, variant or common name See: bone, calcined. 58 BONE

weathering of limestone rocks. Non-marine limestones include travertines and speleothems (cave-deposits; flowstones, stalagmites and stalactites). Lithification of limestones over geological time may produce partial recrystallisation and other chemical alterations of the rock; processes generally covered by the term ‘diagenesis’. Marble is the metamorphic equivalent of limestone, recrystallised at elevated temperatures and pressures. The variety of limestones is enormous and the interested reader

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