Plant Life of Kentucky: An Illustrated Guide to the Vascular Flora

Plant Life of Kentucky: An Illustrated Guide to the Vascular Flora

Ronald L. Jones

Language: English

Pages: 856

ISBN: B002TLTLF8

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Plant Life of Kentucky: An Illustrated Guide to the Vascular Flora

Ronald L. Jones

Language: English

Pages: 856

ISBN: B002TLTLF8

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Plant Life of Kentucky is the first comprehensive guide to all the ferns, flowering herbs, and woody plants of the state. This long-awaited work provides identification keys for Kentucky's 2,600 native and naturalized vascular plants, with notes on wildlife/human uses, poisonous plants, and medicinal herbs. The common name, flowering period, habitat, distribution, rarity, and wetland status are given for each species, and about 80 percent are illustrated with line drawings. The inclusion of 250 additional species from outside the state (these species are "to be expected" in Kentucky) broadens the regional coverage, and most plants occurring from northern Alabama to southern Ohio to the Mississippi River (an area of wide similarity in flora) are examined, including nearly all the plants of western and central Tennessee. The author also describes prehistoric and historical changes in the flora, natural regions and plant communities, significant botanists, current threats to plant life, and a plan for future studies. Plant Life of Kentucky is intended as a research tool for professionals in biology and related fields, and as a resource for students, amateur naturalists, and others interested in understanding and preserving our rich botanical heritage.

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____________________ Fleischmannia. 1. Corollas white, or if pinkish or purplish, then leaves in whorls. 3. Phyllaries subequal, or in 2 series; leaves opposite _________________________________________ Ageratina. 3. Phyllaries strongly imbricate in 3 or more series; leaves opposite or whorled ________________ Eupatorium. KEY C Heads discoid, pappus of numerous capillary bristles; leaves alternate. 1. Receptacle bristly-hairy; outer phyllaries with broad, hyaline tips, the inner ones

preceding combination of features; odor various. 5. Flowers strictly in opposite pairs in terminal spikes or racemes, either sessile or on pedicels shorter than the calyx; one bract per flower; flowers usually relatively large, often 15–35 mm (except Perilla). 6. Leaves cordate; bracts, at least some, longer than the calyx. 7. Corolla blue __________________________________________________ Meehania. 7. Corolla white, sometimes yellowish or greenish ________________________________ Synandra.

[Houstonia lanceolata (Poir.) Britton] H. pusilla Schoepf. Small b. April–May. Dry to wet woods. ME, IP. Rare. [Hedyotis crassifolia Raf.] H. serpyllifolia Michx. Mountain b. May–June. Mesic woods. AP. Rare. FAC. [Hedyotis michauxii Fosberg] MITCHELLA L. M. repens L. Partridge-berry. May–July. Mesic woods. Across KY. Frequent. FACU. OLDENLANDIA L. !O. uniflora L. Clustered bluet. June–Aug. Mudflats. ME. Endangered. FACW. [Hedyotis uniflora (L.) Lam.]. This species is an annual with

with trichome. HALBERD-SHAPED (= Hastate). Arrowhead-shaped but with the two basal lobes turned outward. HALOPHYTE A plant tolerant of salty or alkaline soils. HAMATE Hooked. HAPLOID Having the reduced number of chromosomes typical of gametes; usually with a single set of chromosomes in each nucleus. HASTATE (= Halberd-shaped). Arrowhead-shaped but with the two basal lobes turned outward. HAUSTORIUM (pl. HAUSTORIA) Suckerlike attachment organ of parasitic plants by which they draw their

trees and saplings, as well as dense tangles of blackberries and greenbrier. She also noted that chestnut oak, scarlet oak, pignut hickory, and shagbark hickory were the likely ecological replacements on drier sites and that sugar maple and white oak were increasing in numbers on the more mesic sites. The increase of red maple in these forests is another possible long-term effect from the loss of chestnut. Martin (1987) described the ecological impact of the loss of the American chestnut not only

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