Poetry For Dummies

Poetry For Dummies

The Poetry Center, John Timpane, Maureen Watts

Language: English

Pages: 240

ISBN: B01K0S20G8

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Poetry For Dummies

The Poetry Center, John Timpane, Maureen Watts

Language: English

Pages: 240

ISBN: B01K0S20G8

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Sometimes it seems like there are as many definitions of poetry as there are poems. Coleridge defined poetry as “the best words in the best order.” St. Augustine called it “the Devil’s wine.” For Shelley, poetry was “the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.” But no matter how you define it, poetry has exercised a hold upon the hearts and minds of people for more than five millennia. That’s because for the attentive reader, poetry has the power to send chills shooting down the spine and lightning bolts flashing in the brain — to throw open the doors of perception and hone our sensibilities to a scalpel’s edge.
Poetry For Dummies is a great guide to reading and writing poems, not only for beginners, but for anyone interested in verse. From Homer to Basho, Chaucer to Rumi, Shelley to Ginsberg, it introduces you to poetry’s greatest practitioners. It arms you with the tools you need to understand and appreciate poetry in all its forms, and to explore your own talent as a poet. Discover how to:

Understand poetic language and forms
Interpret poems
Get a handle on poetry through the ages
Find poetry readings near you
Write your own poems
Shop your work around to publishers
Don’t know the difference between an iamb and a trochee? Worry not, this friendly guide demystifies the jargon, and it covers a lot more ground besides, including:

Understanding subject, tone, narrative; and poetic language
Mastering the three steps to interpretation
Facing the challenges of older poetry
Exploring 5,000 years of verse, from Mesopotamia to the global village
Writing open-form poetry
Working with traditional forms of verse
Writing exercises for aspiring poets
Getting published
From Sappho to Clark Coolidge, and just about everyone in between, Poetry For Dummies puts you in touch with the greats of modern and ancient poetry. Need guidance on composing a ghazal, a tanka, a sestina, or a psalm? This is the book for you.

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www.litline.org/hudson New American Writing: Published in association with Columbia College Chicago and edited by Paul Hoover and Maxine Chernoff, this annual magazine publishes poetry and prose true to its name by many up-and-coming writers. A recent issue included translations of poems by 14 Brazilian poets. Sample issues start at $8. OINK! Press, 369 Molino Avenue, Mill Valley, CA 94941 The Paris Review: An international literary quarterly founded in 1953, known for presenting the crème de

The literal meaning is “made description go begging,” a creative way of saying, “You really can’t describe what she was like.” pavilion: A big tent, underneath which Cleopatra is reclining. O’er-picturing that Venus: This phrase means “outdoing that famous picture of Venus.” The speaker is imagining a very famous portrait of Venus, the Roman goddess of love and beauty, and then says Cleopatra was even more beautiful than that. fancy: Imagination. You may not feel you “get” the entire

really means “punish”). That’s irony — saying one thing (“thank”) when you really mean another (“punish”). All these clues lead you to the tone of outrage in this poem. And if Browning is so outraged at FitzGerald, he must really have loved his wife, as the word “sanctified” implies. Sometimes you can pick up tone from clues in what a person says or writes, as in this untitled poem from the classic Chinese poet Liu Tsung-yüan: From one thousand mountains the birds’ flights are gone;

experience. Envision the landscape of the Highlands; sense the rhythm of the girl’s scything; hear the echo of her song throughout the deep valley. There’s a mystery to the scene. You can’t get to the bottom of it — but then, you can’t get to the bottom of music either. You may find yourself thinking about how some songs stay with you long after you hear them, and how you can get the feeling from the melody of a song even though you can’t understand the words. There is a sweetness to this

division it is always there Autumn, fall we say, fruit releases itself You are new enough so the old catches up Cross this bridge come to that one You grow up and ancient history snaps back Rubber band and rake handle The poem turns out to be “Vermont Apollinaire” by William Corbett. Not bad for a stab in the dark at a random shelf in a library. When you read this poem, the first line tells you that it’s about autumn: Corbett writes about summer “go[ing] into” September, an echo of long

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