Politics in Contemporary Vietnam: Party, State, and Authority Relations (Critical Studies of the Asia-Pacific)

Politics in Contemporary Vietnam: Party, State, and Authority Relations (Critical Studies of the Asia-Pacific)

Language: English

Pages: 229

ISBN: 113734752X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Politics in Contemporary Vietnam: Party, State, and Authority Relations (Critical Studies of the Asia-Pacific)

Language: English

Pages: 229

ISBN: 113734752X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Vietnam's political development has entered an extraordinary, if indeterminate, phase. Comprising contributions from leading Vietnam scholars, this volume comprehensively explores the core aspects of Vietnam's politics, providing a cutting-edge analysis of politics in one of East Asia's least understood countries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

units’ performance, the Public Administration Reform (PAR) Index. The stated purposes of the PAR Index are to hold ministries and provinces accountable in implementing PAR measures and to “follow and assess in a concrete and objective manner results of [policy] implementation and PAR measures in government agencies at the central and local levels” (Decision 1294, 2012). The data collected will be published annually. MOHA has developed a two-part system to measure ministerial and provincial

developments in the evolution of accountability relations in Vietnam’s state administrative apparatus. Additional studies carried out by the present author have examined additional aspects of PPCOs authority accountability relations. These studies note that the accountability role of the PCC itself is affected by the way in which the organization is held accountable. And that the PPCO, as an organization, contains multi-layered accountability networks, which are at times contradictory: PPCOs are

This ability of local elites to provide good business conditions to induce investors – and also workers, who follow the employment opportunities – to come to their province is key to the shifting bargaining power State versus State 77 between interest groups. First, local elites gained significant bargaining power vis-à-vis the central elites in Ha Noi. Second, nonelite workers gained bargaining power because they were needed where the economic growth occurred. In places where a local elite

method of meticulous process tracing 82 Thomas Jandl yields more than correlations do. In this light, a recent biography of Deng Xiaoping (Vogel 2011) can add to the debate. In it, the detailed description of the ups and downs of reforms in China paints a picture that indeed indicates that China is different from Vietnam. In China, local officials had to look over their shoulders constantly to gauge which faction – reformers or conservatives – were on the ascent in Beijing. Siding with the

also figure in the mix. Scholars studying contemporary China, whose political system is most similar to Vietnam’s, have begun to do this kind of analysis, contributing a more nuanced understanding of how the Communist Party regime there deals with burgeoning Chinese unrest and dissent in recent years (Yongshun Cai 2008: 38; Xi Chen 2009; Baogang He and Thørgersen 2010; Hongyi Lai 2010; Mackinnon 2011; Ogden 2002; Tong 2002; Tsang 2009; Wright 2002). For contemporary Vietnam, only a few academic

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