Pop-Porn: Pornography in American Culture

Pop-Porn: Pornography in American Culture

Ann C. Hall, Mardia J. Bishop

Language: English

Pages: 208

ISBN: 0275999203

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Pop-Porn: Pornography in American Culture

Ann C. Hall, Mardia J. Bishop

Language: English

Pages: 208

ISBN: 0275999203

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


There is a new wave of pornographic entertainment in contemporary American culture. Liberated from X-rated bookstores and strip clubs, porn is everywhere, and Pop-Porn seeks to examine this phenomenon in some of its most striking manifestations. Written from a variety of perspectives and on a variety of topics representing the widespread increase of soft-core porn in our culture, Pop-Porn offers a detailed and complex approach to the porn industry in America. Rather than focusing on the current polarity of basic pro and con views on this topic―a polarity that ultimately hinders discussion―these essays show that pornographic content is subtly and profoundly embedded in our cultural fabric. This current state of affairs raises questions beyond what's right and what's wrong. It demands that we examine what these representations mean in the first place and what effects they have upon the way we live our lives.

The content of this volume is not limited to the usual porn sites and practices, such as video, prostitution, sex sales, magazines, and the Internet. The essays here go further, examining porn in places many would not expect, such as in grooming practices of pubic hair and the self-promotional strategies of Paris Hilton. The authors who do examine the conventional sites for porn do so in a unique way. Ultimately, these essays collectively demonstrate that Americans are addicted to porn, but are forced to disguise it as fashion, hygiene, class commentary, or other forms of entertainment. Contributors to Pop-Porn come from a wide variety of disciplines―including English, Women's Studies, Communication, Psychology, and Theatre―and their essays address a wide range of porn-infiltrated sites, from magazines to radio to film to television to fashion. While each contributor may perceive porn differently, they all address its pervasiveness in America's current, conservative state.

Our Gods Wear Spandex: The Secret History of Comic Book Heroes

Jeopardy! and Philosophy: What Is Knowledge in the Form of a Question (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Wrong About Japan

Mr. Monk and Philosophy: The Curious Case of the Defective Detective (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

with “fashion” inculcates the wearer into a different sort of community—not radical, condemned, and marginalized porn-folks, but socially appropriate and hip citizens of the times. Calling an outfit “fashionable” also allows conservative Christian women to experience what might otherwise be considered a taboo (porn) by disapproving elders. The Christian-porn conundrum is interesting: while we did not inquire about the religious affiliation of our interview partners, many of our students at KSU

me I’ll be nice to them, but it they’re like little snotty bitches, I mean . . . payback’s hell.”45 In many ways, the entire series can be seen as a kind of “payback” for an audience that is not part of the hereditary aristocracy. We may not consciously align ourselves with Justin per se (he is a minor character), but the show clearly wants us to embrace this sentiment by giving us ample opportunities to mock and criticize these rich, ridiculous girls. In the recurring musical motif associated

representations of female pleasure in her study Hard Core: Power, Pleasure, and the “Frenzy of the Visible”: “[Pornography has] long been a myth of sexual pleasure told from the point of view of men with the power to exploit and objectify the sexuality of women.”66 Both of these analyses point to problematic notions of power in relation to women’s sexuality and the consumer marketplace. Exposing one’s breasts on the pages of Playboy, for Girls Gone Wild, or in the context of a pornographic film,

enjoyment of another. Indeed, this representation is in fact quite typical of how the dominatrix appears in male porn—a figure whose sexual aggression is desirable only in so far as it contributes to the pleasure of another. The pleasure promised to female consumers in this ad is based less on the prospect of an orgasm than it is on adopting an aggressive persona for the sexual arousal of another. In contrast, the Babeland ad is remarkable not simply for its in-your-face use of a “naughty”

the Corpus Christi Caller Times is certain that children learn by imitating. “Monkey see, monkey do,” it begins (“Children Learn by Imitating Adults Around Them.” Corpus Christi Caller Times, November 6, 1999, http://www.coastalbendhealth.com/1999/november/06/today/contribu/581.html. Accessed December 30, 2006). Those who study media violence make their own assumptions about how watching violence may affect behavior. The “Facts About Media and Violence” web page offers this factoid: “Longitudinal

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