Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces from the author of Food in Jars

Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces from the author of Food in Jars

Marisa McClellan

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: 0762449683

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces from the author of Food in Jars

Marisa McClellan

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: 0762449683

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Seasonal Canning in Small Bites

Marisa McClellan was an adult in a high-rise in Philadelphia when she rediscovered canning, and found herself under the preserving spell. She grew accustomed to working in large batches since most “vintage” recipes are written to feed a large family, or to use up a farm-size crop, but increasingly, found that smaller batches suited her life better. Working with a quart, a pound, a pint, or a bunch of produce, not a bushel, allows for dabbling in preserving without committing a whole shelf to storing a single type of jam.

Preserving by the Pint is meant to be a guide for saving smaller batches from farmer’s markets and produce stands—preserving tricks for stopping time in a jar. McClellan’s recipes offer tastes of unusual preserves like Blueberry Maple Jam, Mustardy Rhubarb Chutney, Sorrel Pesto, and Zucchini Bread and Butter Pickles. Organized seasonally, these pestos, sauces, mostardas, chutneys, butters, jams, jellies, and pickles are speedy, too: some take under an hour, leaving you more time to plan your next batch.

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page 11. Place 2 lids in a small saucepan of water and bring to a gentle simmer. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. While it heats, cut the peaches in half and remove the pits. Fill a large bowl with ice water. Blanch the peaches in the boiling water for 1 to 2 minutes, then immediately transfer to the ice water. When cool, remove the peach skins. Combine all the ingredients in a saucepan with a tight-fitting lid over medium heat and stir to combine. Cover and simmer for about 10 minutes,

pints of small tomatoes the way other women buy shoes. I am charmed by their size, their many hues, and their sweet, acidic taste. It is only after I arrive home that I remember that I’m the only tomato eater in my household and that there are already two slightly wrinkly pints of tomatoes in the kitchen. Whenever this happens, I make this spread. It extends the life of those tomatoes and is a dream painted inside omelets or tossed with hot pasta and blobs of creamy goat cheese. And in January,

Place them in a separate glass or plastic bowl and add the sugar. Stir to combine and cover. Let both bowls sit for at least an hour and up to 3 hours. Stir the strawberries once or twice, if possible, to help the sugar draw out their liquid. When you’re ready to cook the marmalade, prepare a boiling water bath and 4 half-pint/250 ml jars according to the process on page 11. Place 4 lids in a small saucepan of water and bring to a gentle simmer. Pour the lemon mixture and the strawberries

radishes will bleed their color into the brine and the interior of the slices; don’t be surprised by the change in color. When they’ve reached the level of tang you like, remove the quarter-pint/125 ml jar, skim any scum from the top of the brine, place a lid on the 1-quart/1-liter jar, and refrigerate. The fermented radishes will keep for several weeks in the refrigerator. Note: Make sure that both jars are scrupulously clean. Because fermentation is a process of allowing beneficial bacteria

breadth and I have a feeling that there are a lot of other people who might just appreciate it as well. TECHNIQUE There are a number of very handy things about preserving in small batches. Because you’re only dealing with modest quantity of produce, the preparation goes fast. What’s more, a number of the recipes call for you to let the fruit sit and rest for a time with the sweetener after you’re done peeling and chopping and pitting. If you’ve run out of time on that particular day, it’s

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