Privacy in the Age of Big Data: Recognizing Threats, Defending Your Rights, and Protecting Your Family

Privacy in the Age of Big Data: Recognizing Threats, Defending Your Rights, and Protecting Your Family

Theresa Payton, Ted Claypoole

Language: English

Pages: 328

ISBN: 1442242574

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Privacy in the Age of Big Data: Recognizing Threats, Defending Your Rights, and Protecting Your Family

Theresa Payton, Ted Claypoole

Language: English

Pages: 328

ISBN: 1442242574

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Digital data collection and surveillance gets more pervasive and invasive by the day; but the best ways to protect yourself and your data are all steps you can take yourself. The devices we use to get just-in-time coupons, directions when we’re lost, and maintain connections with loved ones no matter how far away they are, also invade our privacy in ways we might not even be aware of. Our devices send and collect data about us whenever we use them, but that data is not safeguarded the way we assume it would be.

Privacy is complex and personal. Many of us do not know the full extent to which data is collected, stored, aggregated, and used. As recent revelations indicate, we are subject to a level of data collection and surveillance never before imaginable. While some of these methods may, in fact, protect us and provide us with information and services we deem to be helpful and desired, others can turn out to be insidious and over-arching.

Privacy in the Age of Big Data highlights the many positive outcomes of digital surveillance and data collection while also outlining those forms of data collection to which we may not consent, and of which we are likely unaware. Payton and Claypoole skillfully introduce readers to the many ways we are ‘watched,’ and how to adjust our behaviors and activities to recapture our privacy. The authors suggest the tools, behavior changes, and political actions we can take to regain data and identity security. Anyone who uses digital devices will want to read this book for its clear and no-nonsense approach to the world of big data and what it means for all of us.

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would be better protected if we created a presumption that collecting evidence from new technologies always requires a warrant. Then police would have to justify why the law-enforcement value outweighed the intrusion on privacy as each new technology comes into use. This approach also makes sense because the police have a stronger legislative lobby and judicial presence than advocates for personal privacy. So law enforcement is in a much better position to fight for its desired results than the

where your data is online, how criminals and cybersnoops go after it, and what you can do to minimize the damage when a breach occurs. Privacy is crucial to stopping online criminals. The more they know or can figure out about your online activity—your bank accounts, your tax filings, your electronic medical records, your children’s activities—the easier it will be for a criminal to take what he wants from you. Protecting your privacy is the first line of defense against the bad guys. In the

do not know they are there. Many web bugs collect detailed information about you, such as the device ID, IP addresses, dates and times you are online, and perhaps even where you visited. Tracking Your Email Most people on the planet today can send and receive email. Many have several accounts, some active and some forgotten. But not everyone realizes that all email providers can and will access their emails. Your email provider looks at your message headers, which usually include the date

only send and receive a short text message, they became the pocketknife of the 1980s, providing a single-function tool that easily fit in your pocket or purse. In comparison, today’s smartphones are the ultimate Swiss-army knife of electronics, providing an array of diverse tools in pocket-friendly form. Smartphones are full computers, capable of managing an entire office, accessing documents and video online, and acting as a mail server and text message machine. Your smartphone can replace your

IMSI-catchers that will work out the mobile phone numbers of any people in a certain area,” Tynan says. “If police deploy these things for crowd control there’s no issue with them figuring out every single person who’s in there—and their mobile phone numbers. They can also intercept calls and send out false messages. It’s not just the police either. Cybercriminals can use these, or even business opponents. This technology already exists.”[7] Many of us do not think of our faces as private, but

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