Professional Sewing Techniques for Designers by Julie Christine Cole, Sharon Czachor [Fairchild,2008] (Hardcover)

Professional Sewing Techniques for Designers by Julie Christine Cole, Sharon Czachor [Fairchild,2008] (Hardcover)

Language: English

Pages: 0

ISBN: B00DWWGRFU

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Professional Sewing Techniques for Designers by Julie Christine Cole, Sharon Czachor [Fairchild,2008] (Hardcover)

Language: English

Pages: 0

ISBN: B00DWWGRFU

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Professional Sewing Techniques for Designers by Julie Christine Cole, Sharon Czachor. Published by Fairchild,2008, Binding: Hardcover

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underarm seams. Use the number 4 corresponds to linen; and number 5 cotton side for pressing most fabrics; the wool is the highest setting, with the most amount of side can be used for pressing woolen fabrics. heat, which in the case of the gravity-feed irons Using a seam roll helps to avoid seam impresis really hot! Change the heat temperature to sions that might otherwise show to the correct match the fabric type when pressing. It is advis- side of the garment after pressing. FIGURE 2.51

the human form. Figure 3.3b is a transparent view of the dress, showing the space between the form and the silhouette of the garment. The designer's responsibility is to think through how the strapless bodice would be stabilized to fit to the form and how Professional Sewing Techniques for Designers ~ F I G U R E 3.4 TAKE THE F A B R I C I N YOUR HANDS AND DRAPE IT O N Y O U R S E L F OR T H E D R E S S F O R M . OBSERVE HOW THE FABRIC DRAPES AND THE STRUCTURE IT CREATES. -) \ . ~~~~ ~~

stabilizers on knit fabric in areas that need to stretch. Don't stabilize loose knits with fusible interfacing, because the resin will seep through open-weave knits. In loose-weave knits, design garments that don't need stabilizing; use a knir lining instead. Don't use fusible interfacing on ribbed knit, as it does not fuse well to this surface. Knits Don't assume that stabilizers are unnecessary in knit fabrics: there are times when interfacing is needed to stabilize parts of garments and

allowance. Clip the corners to reduce bulk, turn, and press (see Figure 5.3a). This flap/welt can also be made in two pieces, using lining fabric for the under flap to reduce bulk. Any decorative stitching on the flap/welt should be done before attaching the flap/welt to the garment. The flap is attached to the garment by matching the markings for placement. The flap is placed with the raw edges facing toward the hem. The raw edges can be clean finished by serging, or if the fabric is light-

be hard to get back into smooth and flat and prepares the fabric to be the garment to press. For more information, stitched to the next fabric piece. refer to Chapter 2, "How to Press a Garment." Professional S e w i n g Techniques for D e s i g n e r s the seam allowance to spread and open so it can be joined to another shaped fabric piece. Figure 6.6b illustrates this clearly. Any clipped seam has pressure at these points, and a staystitch acts as a fence, preventing the clipping from

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