Prussian Napoleonic Tactics 1792-1815 (Elite)

Prussian Napoleonic Tactics 1792-1815 (Elite)

Peter Hofschröer

Language: English

Pages: 64

ISBN: 1846035090

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Prussian Napoleonic Tactics 1792-1815 (Elite)

Peter Hofschröer

Language: English

Pages: 64

ISBN: 1846035090

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Osprey's examination of Prussia's battle tactics during the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815). Written by a leading expert on the Prussian army of the Napoleonic era, this title provides crucial insight into the 18th century evolution of the Prussian forces, the war-winning troops of the final battles against Napoleon. Using contemporary materials including drill regulations, instructions, staff and regimental histories and after action reports, this book provides a compelling history of the Prussian tactics from 1792 until 1815.

It includes a study of the professional Prussian army during the Revolutionary Wars to the mass mobilization of a conscript army that fought during the Wars of Liberation and Waterloo. Following on from the success of Osprey's other Elite Tactics volumes, this is a must-have for serious students of Napoleonic warfare, armchair generals, and wargamers alike.

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Mastering the Art of War

White Plague (Joe Rush, Book 1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

numbering), each of roughly 100 men; the divisions were aligned in pairs, with men drawn up in three ranks. The frontage of a battalion closed up in column was supposedly 50 paces. The battalion commander (CO) led from the front on horseback, flanked by a bugler (B) and a drummer (D) who could signal his orders. In the front ranks an officer marched on the outer flank of each division, with an NCO on the inner flank; the other subaltern officers and the remainder of the NCOs were spaced along behind the

by the Landwehr militia. These preparations would allow the army to expand and mobilize for the Wars of Liberation in 1813. (Richard Knötel; author’s collection) 44 THE 1812 INFANTRY REGULATIONS The first major reform planned had been the introduction of permanent all-arms divisions and corps, but under the circumstances this could not be properly implemented. Instead, permanent brigades of mixed arms were established. Once that was done the necessary drill regulations were drafted; these went

battalions battle drills 6–8 Bavarian Succession, War of the (1778–79) 10 Blücher, Gen Gebhardt Leberecht von 9, 24, 25, 25 Army of Silesia 52 at Frisange 17, 19 at Waterloo 61 Brandenburg Cuirassier Regiment 54, 56–7 Bressonet, Pascal 41 brigades 48–9, 52 attack formation (1812 regulations) F(46–7) chequerboard formation 49, G(50–1) command structure 62 deployed to meet cavalry 49, G(50–1), 52 deployment (1812) regulations 44, 61 at Plancenoit H(58–9) Brunswick, Carl William Ferdinand, Duke of

determined to hold their ground, Moreau massed 12,000 men the next evening: 12 infantry battalions, three cavalry regiments, and 52 guns including battalion pieces. He marched them through the night on the road from Zweibrücken to Pirmasens, and reached Fehrbach, 1½ miles north-west of Pirmasens, at daybreak, thus by-passing fortifications on the heights south-west of the town (see map). The Duke of Brunswick had anticipated such a manoeuvre, and had ordered his men to remain alert that night.

with Hohenlohe’s corps, whose left made contact with the Austrians at Wissembourg. The previous summer, Brunswick had seen to it that the fortifications at Kaiserslautern were strengthened. Earthworks were built on the western side of the ridge to the north of the town that runs down to the south-west, while one redoubt was constructed facing Moorlautern and another to the north of that village. A trench and abatis 2½ miles south-west of Kaiserslautern cut the road to Homburg, and a further

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