Publishing Pedagogies for the Doctorate and Beyond

Publishing Pedagogies for the Doctorate and Beyond

Barbara Kamler

Language: English

Pages: 176

ISBN: 0415480191

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Publishing Pedagogies for the Doctorate and Beyond

Barbara Kamler

Language: English

Pages: 176

ISBN: 0415480191

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Within a context of rapid growth and diversification in higher degree research programs, there is increasing pressure for the results of doctoral research to be made public. Doctoral students are now being encouraged to publish not only after completion of the doctorate, but also during, and even as part of their research program. For many this is a new and challenging feature of their experience of doctoral education.

Publishing Pedagogies for the Doctorate and Beyond is a timely and informative collection of practical and theorised examples of innovative pedagogies that encourage doctoral student publishing. The authors give detailed accounts of their own pedagogical practices so that others may build on their experiences, including: a program of doctoral degree by publication; mentoring strategies to support student publishing; innovations within existing programs, including embedded publication pedagogies; co-editing a special issue of a scholarly journal with students; ‘publication brokering’, and writing groups and writing retreats.

With contributions from global leading experts, this vital new book:

  • explores broader issues pertaining to journal publication and the impacts on scholarly research and writing practices for students, supervisors and the academic publishing community
  • takes up particular pedagogical problems and strategies, including curriculum and supervisory responses arising from the ‘push to publish’
  • documents explicit experiences and practical strategies that foster writing-for-publication during doctoral candidature.

Publishing Pedagogies for the Doctorate and Beyond explores the challenges and rewards of supporting doctoral publishing and provides new ways to increase research publication outputs in a pedagogically sound way. It will be a valued resource for supervisors and their doctoral students, as well as for program coordinators and managers, academic developers, learning advisors, and others involved in doctoral education.

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One Japanese man who was already secure in his tenured job wanted to move into a more nourishing environment, and both the degree and publications would help him do that. However, he could not find a way to think about publishing yet, given his schedule. A North American man explained that “Right now, finishing the doctorate is what I want to concentrate on most.” A Japanese woman also “prioritized finishing my dissertation.” Nevertheless, she presented some of her dissertation work at an

process and provide insights into the genres and debates that surround the practices of peer review. What they do not do, however, is explicitly address issues of Revise and resubmit  67 pedagogy or develop mediation strategies to sustain aspiring writers. In this chapter I attempt such a move by working with the concept of publication brokering as a discursive social practice. My aim is to imagine new ways of working with early career writers after their articles have been reviewed and

se, we have made brief reference to the QAA in the UK and the RTS in Australia where relevant. • The paper refers to the disciplinary contexts within which research writing takes place but the two case studies give little insight into how such contexts might play a part in the work RWGs do. Please give more details and examples. We acknowledge the request for detail of disciplinary contexts for RWGs. We want to stress that specific disciplinary work has not been the purpose of these particular

may assume that their membership in a racially diverse “urban community” automatically defines them as knowledgeable about diversity and being “non-racist” ’? As Amanda became more comfortable in her role as a collaborative author, she focused more on larger issues of content and organization. For example, in responding to a draft of chapter for their book, Amanda suggested reorganizing the chapter: Richard, it seems to me that we might not need to explain the model of 128  Thein and Beach

peer-reviewed journals 12; see also scholarly journals Jones, R. 2, 11, 83, 85, 100, 116 Kamler, B. i, iii, v, x, xi, 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 27, 32, 40, 41, 43, 45, 64, 65, 68, 69, 71, 73, 82, 117, 121, 129, 135, 137, 138, 140, 147, 154 Lave, J. 91, 100 Lee, A. i, iii, v, x, 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 28, 29, 32, 40, 44, 47, 71, 73, 75, 82, 83, 95, 97, 99, 100, 115, 116, 132, 135, 137, 154 Lee, E. 62 Li, Y. 48, 55, 62, 63 Lillis, T. 47, 62, 63, 67, 82, 85, 86, 100 Lundell, D. 43,

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